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Spatial specialization and farm-nonfarm linkages

Author

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  • Deichmann, Uwe
  • Shilpi, Forhad
  • Vakis, Renos

Abstract

Using individual level employment data from Bangladesh, this paper presents empirical evidence on the relative importance of farm and urban linkages for rural nonfarm employment. The econometric results indicate that high return wage work and self-employment in nonfarm activities cluster around major urban centers. The negative effects of isolation on high return wage work and on self-employment are magnified in locations with higher agricultural potential. The low return nonfarm activities respond primarily to local demand displaying no significant spatial variation. The empirical results highlight the need for improved connectivity of regions with higher agricultural potential to urban centers for nonfarm development in Bangladesh.

Suggested Citation

  • Deichmann, Uwe & Shilpi, Forhad & Vakis, Renos, 2008. "Spatial specialization and farm-nonfarm linkages," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4611, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4611
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lewis, Blane D. & Thorbecke, Erik, 1992. "District-level economic linkages in Kenya: Evidence based on a small regional social accounting matrix," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-897, June.
    2. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 2004. "Agricultural Productivity Growth, Rural Economic Diversity, and Economic Reforms: India, 1970-2000," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(3), pages 509-542, April.
    3. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter & Brown, James, 1989. "Farm-nonfarm linkages in rural sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(8), pages 1173-1201, August.
    4. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, P. B. R. & Reardon, Thomas, 2002. "Strategies for stimulating poverty-alleviating growth in the rural nonfarm economy in developing countries:," EPTD discussion papers 92, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Marcel Fafchamps & Forhad Shilpi, 2005. "Cities and Specialisation: Evidence from South Asia," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(503), pages 477-504, April.
    6. Jacoby, Hanan C, 2000. "Access to Markets and the Benefits of Rural Roads," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(465), pages 713-737, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Massimiliano Calì & Carlo Menon, 2013. "Does Urbanization Affect Rural Poverty? Evidence from Indian Districts," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 27(2), pages 171-201.
    2. Fuwa, Nobuhiko & Balisacan, Arsenio M. & Mapa, Dennis & Abad Santos, Carlos & Piza, Sharon Faye, 2012. "Sectoral Growth Linkages and the Role of Infrastructure Development: Revisiting the sources of nonfarm development in the rural Philippines," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126456, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Asfaw, Solomon & Savastano, Sara, 2015. "Topic: Building Resilience to Climate Change Through Social Protection and Climate-Smart Agriculture: Synergies and Trade-offs," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210963, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Davis, Benjamin & Di Giuseppe, Stefania & Zezza, Alberto, 2017. "Are African households (not) leaving agriculture? Patterns of households’ income sources in rural Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 153-174.
    5. World Bank, 2004. "Sri Lanka - Reshaping Economic Geography : Connecting People to Prosperity," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 21549, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Rural Poverty Reduction; Crops&Crop Management Systems; Labor Policies;

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