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Can food-based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron deficiencies?

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  • Ruel, Marie T.

Abstract

Micronutrient malnutrition is still a problem of unacceptable proportions in developing countries. Iron and vitamin A deficiencies are the most widespread nutrition deficiencies in the world today, affecting perhaps as many as 3.5 billion people..... Food-based approaches are essential to the fight against micronutrient deficiencies. Of all the strategies, they probably require the highest level of initial investment, but they are also the only ones that hold a promise of sustainability. The evidence presented in this Food Policy Review highlights the key role of education in ensuring the success of food-based approaches. Changing people's behavior in terms of the foods they grow and eat and how they prepare and process them requires a significant amount of effort. It is, however, the only way to enable people to take ultimate responsibility for the quality of their diet. (from Foreword by Per Pinstrup-Andersen)

Suggested Citation

  • Ruel, Marie T., 2001. "Can food-based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron deficiencies?," Food policy reviews 5, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:fprevi:5
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    Cited by:

    1. Stein, Alexander J. & Sachdev, H.P.S. & Qaim, Matin, 2006. "Potential Impacts of Golden Rice on Public Health in India," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25381, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Kirk, Angeli & Kilic, Talip & Carletto, Calogero, 2015. "How Does Composition of Household Income Affect Child Nutrition Outcomes? Evidence from Uganda," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212006, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. E. Udoh & P. Kormawa, 2009. "Determinants for cassava production expansion in the semi-arid zone of West Africa," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 345-357, April.
    4. Hoddinott, John & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "The Impact of PROGRESA on Food Consumption," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 37-61, October.
    5. Stein, Alexander J. & Sachdev, H.P.S. & Qaim, Matin, 2006. "Can genetic engineering for the poor pay off? An ex-ante evaluation of Golden Rice in India," Research in Development Economics and Policy (Discussion Paper Series) 8534, Universitaet Hohenheim, Department of Agricultural Economics and Social Sciences in the Tropics and Subtropics.
    6. Johnston, Deborah & Stevano, Sara & Malapit, Hazel J. & Hull, Elizabeth & Kadiyala, Suneetha, 2015. "Agriculture, gendered time use, and nutritional outcomes: A systematic review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1456, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Pandey, Vijay Laxmi & Mahendra Dev, S. & Jayachandran, Usha, 2016. "Impact of agricultural interventions on the nutritional status in South Asia: A review," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 28-40.
    8. Ruel, Marie T. & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Balagamwala, Mysbah, 2017. "Nutrition-sensitive agriculture: What have we learned and where do we go from here?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1681, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. World Bank, 2007. "United Republic of Tanzania : Advancing Nutrition for Long-Term Equitable Growth," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7645, The World Bank.
    10. Brown, Lynn & Gentilini, Ugo, 2006. "On the Edge: The Role of Food-based Safety Nets in Helping Vulnerable Households Manage Food Insecurity," WIDER Working Paper Series 111, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Kabunga, Nassul, 2014. "Adoption and Impact of Improved Cow Breeds on Household Welfare and Child Nutrition Outcomes: Empirical Evidence from Uganda," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 170517, Agricultural Economics Society.
    12. Mwangi, Edina Metili & Yu, Bingxin, 2015. "Agricultural diversification and Land use patterns in Southeast Asia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211864, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    13. De Groote, Hugo & Kimenju, Simon Chege, 2008. "Comparing consumer preferences for color and nutritional quality in maize: Application of a semi-double-bound logistic model on urban consumers in Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 362-370, August.
    14. Rashid, Dewan Arif & Smith, Lisa C. & Rahman, Tauhidur, 2011. "Determinants of Dietary Quality: Evidence from Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2221-2231.
    15. Emily Levitt & Rebecca Stoltzfus & David Pelletier & Alice Pell, 2009. "A community food system analysis as formative research for a comprehensive anemia control program in Northern Afghanistan," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 1(2), pages 177-195, June.
    16. Ecker, Olivier & Mabiso, Athur & Kennedy, Adam & Diao, Xinshen 22905, 2011. "Making agriculture pro-nutrition: Opportunities in Tanzania," IFPRI discussion papers 1124, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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