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Price Dispersion and Inflation Persistence

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  • Takushi Kurozumi
  • Willem Van Zandweghe

Abstract

Persistent responses of inflation to monetary policy shocks have been difficult to explain by existing models of the monetary transmission mechanism without embedding controversial intrinsic inertia of inflation. Our paper addresses this issue using a staggered price model with trend inflation, a smoothed-off kink in demand curves, and a fixed cost of production. In this model, inflation exhibits a persistent response to a policy shock even in the absence of its intrinsic inertia, because the kink causes a measure of price dispersion, which is intrinsically inertial, to become a key source of inflation persistence under the positive trend inflation rate. {{p}} In addition, output and labor productivity both rise after an expansionary policy shock as in an estimated structural vector autoregression model. Moreover, credible disinflation induces a gradual decline in inflation and a fall in output as observed during the Volcker disinflation era.

Suggested Citation

  • Takushi Kurozumi & Willem Van Zandweghe, 2016. "Price Dispersion and Inflation Persistence," Research Working Paper RWP 16-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, revised 01 Oct 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkrw:rwp16-09
    DOI: 10.18651/RWP2016-09
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.18651/RWP2016-09
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Takushi Kurozumi & Willem Van Zandweghe, 2016. "Kinked Demand Curves, the Natural Rate Hypothesis, and Macroeconomic Stability," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 20, pages 240-257, April.
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    5. Dotsey, Michael & King, Robert G., 2005. "Implications of state-dependent pricing for dynamic macroeconomic models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 213-242, January.
    6. Galí, Jordi & Gertler, Mark, 1999. "Inflation Dynamics: A Structural Economic Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 2246, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Kurozumi, Takushi & Van Zandweghe, Willem, 2017. "Trend Inflation And Equilibrium Stability: Firm-Specific Versus Homogeneous Labor," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(4), pages 947-981, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yasufumi Gemma & Takushi Kurozumi & Mototsugu Shintani, 2017. "Trend Inflation and Evolving Inflation Dynamics: A Bayesian GMM Analysis of the Generalized New Keynesian Phillips Curve," IMES Discussion Paper Series 17-E-10, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary policy; Prices; Fixed production cost; Inflation; Disinflation;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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