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A Tale of Two Sectors : Why is Misallocation Higher in Services than in Manufacturing?

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  • Daniel A. Dias
  • Carlos Robalo Marques
  • Christine Richmond

Abstract

Recent empirical studies document that the level of resource misallocation in the service sector is significantly higher than in the manufacturing sector. We quantify the importance of this difference and study its sources. Conservative estimates for Portugal (2008) show that closing this gap, by reducing misallocation in the service sector to manufacturing levels, would boost aggregate gross output by around 12 percent and aggregate value added by around 31 percent. Differences in the effect and size of productivity shocks explain most of the gap in misallocation between manufacturing and services, while the remainder is explained by differences in firm productivity and age distribution. We interpret these results as stemming mainly from higher output-price rigidity, higher labor adjustment costs, and higher informality in the service sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel A. Dias & Carlos Robalo Marques & Christine Richmond, 2018. "A Tale of Two Sectors : Why is Misallocation Higher in Services than in Manufacturing?," International Finance Discussion Papers 1229, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1229
    DOI: 10.17016/IFDP.2018.1229
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Misallocation ; Productivity ; Firm-level data ; Structural transformation ; Gelbach decomposition;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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