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Careful in the crisis? Determinants of older people's informal care receipt in crisis-struck European countries

Author

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  • Costa-i-Font, Joan
  • Karlsson, Martin
  • Øien, Henning

Abstract

Macroeconomic downturns can have an important impact on the receipt of informal and formal long-term care, since recessions increase the number of unemployed and affect net wealth. This paper investigates how the market for informal care changed during and after the Great Recession in Europe, with particular focus on their various determinants. We use data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe, which includes a rich set of variables covering waves before and after the Great Recession. We find evidence of an increase in the availability of informal care after the economic downturn when controlling for year and country fixed effects. This trend is mainly driven by changes in care provision of individuals not cohabiting with the care recipient. We also find evidence of several determinants of informal care receipt changing during the crisis such as physical needs, personal wealth and household structures.

Suggested Citation

  • Costa-i-Font, Joan & Karlsson, Martin & Øien, Henning, 2016. "Careful in the crisis? Determinants of older people's informal care receipt in crisis-struck European countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66916, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:66916
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/66916/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:pal:gpprii:v:44:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1057_s41288-018-00114-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Slawa Rokicki & Jessica Cohen & Gunther Fink & Joshua Salomon & Mary Beth Landrum, 2018. "Inference with difference-in-differences with a small number of groups: a review, simulation study and empirical application using SHARE data," CHaRMS Working Papers 18-01, Centre for HeAlth Research at the Management School (CHaRMS).
    3. Korfhage, Thorben, 2019. "Long-run consequences of informal elderly care and implications of public long-term care insurance," Ruhr Economic Papers 813, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    4. repec:kap:decono:v:166:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10645-018-9323-1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    long-term care; informal care; great recession; downturn; old age dependency;

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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