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Careful in the Crisis? Determinants of Older People's Informal Care Receipt in Crisis‐Struck European Countries

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  • Joan Costa‐Font
  • Martin Karlsson
  • Henning Øien

Abstract

Macroeconomic downturns can have an important impact on the receipt of informal and formal long‐term care, because recessions increase the number of unemployed and affect net wealth. This paper investigates how the market for informal care changed during and after the Great Recession in Europe, with particular focus on the determinants of care receipt. We use data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, which includes a rich set of variables covering waves before and after the Great Recession. We find evidence of an increase in the availability of informal care after the economic downturn when controlling for year and country fixed effects. This trend is mainly driven by changes in care provision of individuals not cohabiting with the care recipient. We also find evidence of several determinants of informal care receipt changing during the crisis – such as physical needs, personal wealth, and household structures. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Joan Costa‐Font & Martin Karlsson & Henning Øien, 2016. "Careful in the Crisis? Determinants of Older People's Informal Care Receipt in Crisis‐Struck European Countries," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(S2), pages 25-42, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:25:y:2016:i:s2:p:25-42
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.3385
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    Cited by:

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    2. Martin Eling & Omid Ghavibazoo, 2019. "Research on long-term care insurance: status quo and directions for future research," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 44(2), pages 303-356, April.
    3. Slawa Rokicki & Jessica Cohen & Gunther Fink & Joshua Salomon & Mary Beth Landrum, 2018. "Inference with difference-in-differences with a small number of groups: a review, simulation study and empirical application using SHARE data," CHaRMS Working Papers 18-01, Centre for HeAlth Research at the Management School (CHaRMS).
    4. Mommaerts, Corina & Truskinovsky, Yulya, 2020. "The cyclicality of informal care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    5. Korfhage, Thorben, 2019. "Long-run consequences of informal elderly care and implications of public long-term care insurance," Ruhr Economic Papers 813, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Analía Viola, 2020. "La asistencia residencial en España y COVID-19," Studies on the Spanish Economy eee2020-20, FEDEA.
    7. Nicola Ciccarelli & Arthur Soest, 2018. "Informal Caregiving, Employment Status and Work Hours of the 50+ Population in Europe," De Economist, Springer, vol. 166(3), pages 363-396, September.
    8. Walsh, Brendan & Lyons, Seán, 2021. "Demand for the Statutory Home Care Scheme," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS122.

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    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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