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Conclude Doha: It Matters!

Author

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  • Hoekman, Bernard
  • Martin, Will
  • Mattoo, Aaditya

Abstract

The Doha Round must be concluded not because it will produce dramatic liberalization but because it will create greater security of market access. Its conclusion would strengthen, symbolically and substantively, the WTO’s valuable role in restraining protectionism. What is on the table would constrain the scope for tariff protection in all goods, ban agricultural export subsidies in the industrial countries and sharply reduce the scope for distorting domestic support—by 70 per cent in the EU and 60 per cent in the US. Average farm tariffs that exporters face would fall to 12 per cent (from 14.5 per cent) and the tariffs on exports of manufactures to less than 2.5 per cent (from about 3 per cent). There are also environmental benefits to be captured, in particular disciplining the use of subsidies that encourage over-fishing and lowering tariffs on technologies that can help mitigate global warming. An agreement to facilitate trade by cutting red tape will further expand trade opportunities. Greater market access for the least-developed countries will result from the “duty free and quota free” proposal and their ability to take advantage of new opportunities will be enhanced by the Doha-related “aid for trade” initiative. Finally, concluding Doha would create space for multilateral cooperation on critical policy matters that lie outside the Doha Agenda, most urgently the trade policy implications of climate change mitigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoekman, Bernard & Martin, Will & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2010. "Conclude Doha: It Matters!," CEPR Discussion Papers 7788, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7788
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Yvan Decreux & Lionel Fontagné, 2011. "Economic Impact of Potential Outcome of the DDA," Working Papers 2011-23, CEPII research center.
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    9. Bernard Hoekman & Alessandro Nicita, 2010. "Assessing the Doha Round: Market access, transactions costs and aid for trade facilitation," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 65-79.
    10. Mitchell, Donald, 2008. "A note on rising food prices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4682, The World Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yvan Decreux & Lionel Fontagné, 2014. "What next for the DDA? Quantifying the role of negotiation modalities," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/61, European University Institute.
    2. Bouet, Antoine & Laborde, David, 2010. "Eight Years of Doha Trade Talks: Where Do We Stand?," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 11(2).
    3. Popa, Diana, 2011. "Runda Doha: început fără sfârşit
      [Doha Round: the endless beginning]
      ," MPRA Paper 28764, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 09 Feb 2011.
    4. Alan Matthews, 2014. "Doha negotiations on agriculture and future of the WTO multilateral Trade System," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 1, March.
    5. Hoekman, Bernard, 2011. "The WTO and the Doha Round: Walking on Two Legs," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 68, pages 1-6, October.
    6. Rachel McCulloch, 2010. "The International Trading System and Its Future," Working Papers 08, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    7. Bernard M. Hoekman & Petros C. Mavroidis, 2015. "A Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement for Services?," RSCAS Working Papers 2015/25, European University Institute.
    8. Kawai, Masahiro & Wignaraja, Ganeshan, 2011. "Asian FTAs: Trends, prospects and challenges," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 1-22, February.
    9. Bernard Hoekman, 2014. "Sustaining multilateral trade cooperation in a multipolar world economy," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 241-260, June.
    10. Nicholas Crafts, 2013. "Long-Term Growth in Europe: What Difference does the Crisis Make?," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 224(1), pages 14-28, May.
    11. repec:rej:journl:v:16:y:2013:i:47:p:193-210 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Decreux, Yvan & Fontagné, Lionel, 2015. "What Next for Multilateral Trade Talks? Quantifying the Role of Negotiation Modalities," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(01), pages 29-43, January.
    13. Klaus Deutsch, 2011. "Doha or Dada: The World Trade Regime at an Historic Crossroads," Working Papers id:4292, eSocialSciences.
    14. Yvan Decreux & Lionel Fontagné, 2014. "What next for the DDA? Quantifying the role of negotiation modalities," Working Papers hal-01299828, HAL.
    15. Wolfe, Robert, 2010. "Endogenous Learning and Consensual Understanding in Multilateral Negotiations: Arguing and Bargaining in the WTO," Working Papers 90885, Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Doha Development Agenda; trade agreements; trade negotiations; WTO;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • F5 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy

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