IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book or follow this series

International trade and Climate Change : Economic, Legal, and Institutional Perspectives

  • World Bank
Registered author(s):

    The broad objective of this study is to analyze areas in which the climate change agenda intersects with multilateral trade obligations. The study identifies the key issues at stake, as well as possible actions -- at the national and multilateral levels -- that could help developing countries strengthen their capacities to respond to emerging conflicts between international trade and global climate regimes while taking advantage of new opportunities. The study also attempts to respond to the need for more sector-specific analysis. Chapter two contributes to the literature by exploring the economic, environmental, and political rationale underlying the potential tension between implementation of the Kyoto Protocol and the existing World Trade Organization (WTO) principles. The chapter further identifies areas where priorities for proactive policy initiatives could minimize potential damage to both trade and global environmental regimes. Chapter three explores and identifies key barriers and opportunities to spur the transfer and diffusion of climate-friendly and clean-energy technologies in developing countries. It further identifies policies and institutional changes that could lead to the removal of barriers and increased market penetration of climate-friendly technology. Chapter four examines and builds on the different approaches that have emerged in the negotiations surrounding trade in environmental goods and services, and it proposes a framework for integrating climate objectives in the discussions. Chapter five presents the conclusions and provides a framework for integrating and streamlining the global environment within the global trading system.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/6831/41453optmzd0PA101OFFICIAL0USE0ONLY1.pdf?sequence=1
    Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 500 Internal Server Error. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Thomas Breineder)


    Download Restriction: no

    as
    in new window

    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 6831 and published in 2007.
    ISBN: 978-0-8213-7225-8
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6831
    Contact details of provider: Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Kee, Hiau Looi & Nicita, Alessandro & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2006. "Estimating trade restrictiveness indices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3840, The World Bank.
    2. World Bank, 2007. "Global Economic Prospects 2007 : Managing the Next Wave of Globalization," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7157.
    3. Rodney D. Ludema & Ian Wooton, 1994. "Cross-Border Externalities and Trade Liberalization: The Strategic Control of Pollution," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 950-66, November.
    4. Fredriksson Per G & Mani Muthukumara, 2004. "Trade Integration and Political Turbulence: Environmental Policy Consequences," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 1-28, February.
    5. Robert Hamwey, 2005. "Environmental Goods: Where Do the Dynamic Trade Opportunities for Developing Countries Lie?," International Trade 0512015, EconWPA.
    6. Lecocq, Franck & Shalizi, Zmarak, 2004. "Will the Kyoto Protocol affect growth in Russia?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3454, The World Bank.
    7. Markusen, James R., 1975. "International externalities and optimal tax structures," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 15-29, February.
    8. Zhang, ZhongXiang & Assunção, Lucas, 2002. "Domestic climate policies and the WTO," MPRA Paper 13223, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2000. "Exports and Information Spillovers," CEPR Discussion Papers 2560, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2003. "The Environment and Globalization," NBER Working Papers 10090, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Joy A. Kim, 2007. "Issues of Dual Use and Reviewing Product Coverage of Environmental Goods," OECD Trade and Environment Working Papers 2007/1, OECD Publishing.
    12. Fredriksson, Per G. & Vollebergh, Herman R. J. & Dijkgraaf, Elbert, 2004. "Corruption and energy efficiency in OECD countries: theory and evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 207-231, March.
    13. van Beers, Cees & van den Bergh, Jeroen C J M, 1997. "An Empirical Multi-country Analysis of the Impact of Environmental Regulations on Foreign Trade Flows," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 29-46.
    14. Muthukumara Mani, 1996. "Environmental tariffs on polluting imports," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(4), pages 391-411, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6831. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.