IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

International Trade and Global Warming


  • Jota Ishikawa

    (Faculty of Economics, Hitotsubashi University)

  • Kazuharu Kiyono

    (Waseda University, University of Tokyo)


In a non-cooperative strategic environmental regulation, unilateral regulation may yield the so-called "carbon-leakage" and the government choice over the emission taxes and quotas play an important role. Furthermore, the trade and industrial structure of a country critically hinges on the government's policy tools. The paper shows that emission taxes makes the competitive production equilibrium unstable, while emission standards work as "hidden production subsidy" towards emission-intensive industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Jota Ishikawa & Kazuharu Kiyono, 2000. "International Trade and Global Warming," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-78, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2000cf78

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Copeland, Brian R. & Taylor, M. Scott, 1999. "Trade, spatial separation, and the environment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 137-168, February.
    2. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1994. "North-South Trade and the Global Environment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 851-874, September.
    3. Rodney D. Ludema & Ian Wooton, 1994. "Cross-Border Externalities and Trade Liberalization: The Strategic Control of Pollution," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 950-966, November.
    4. James R. Markusen, 1976. "Production and Trade from International Common Property Resources," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 9(2), pages 309-319, May.
    5. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1993. "North-South trade and the dynamics of renewable resources," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 219-248, December.
    6. James R. Markusen, 1975. "Cooperative Control of International Pollution and Common Property Resources," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 89(4), pages 618-632.
    7. Copeland, Brian R & Taylor, M Scott, 1995. "Trade and Transboundary Pollution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(4), pages 716-737, September.
    8. Markusen, James R., 1975. "International externalities and optimal tax structures," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 15-29, February.
    9. Brian R. Copeland & M. Scott Taylor, 1994. "North-South Trade and the Environment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(3), pages 755-787.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kazuharu Kiyono & Jota Ishikawa, 2013. "Environmental Management Policy Under International Carbon Leakage," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54, pages 1057-1083, August.
    2. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:17:y:2005:i:3:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jota Ishikawa & Toshihiro Okubo, 2017. "Greenhouse-Gas Emission Controls and Firm Locations in North–South Trade," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 67(4), pages 637-660, August.
    4. Panos Hatzipanayotou & Sajal Lahiri & Michael S. Michael, 2002. "Can cross-border pollution reduce pollution?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 805-818, November.
    5. Shiro Takeda, 2005. "The effect of differentiated emission taxes: does an emission tax favor industry?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 17(3), pages 1-10.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2000cf78. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CIRJE administrative office). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.