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Environmental Goods: Where Do the Dynamic Trade Opportunities for Developing Countries Lie?

Author

Listed:
  • Robert Hamwey

    (Cen2eco: Centre for Economic & Ecological Studies)

Abstract

This study seeks to review some of the key issues surrounding ongoing WTO negotiations on trade liberalisation of environmental goods and to provide trade data and analyses to assess developing countries’ current and potential performance in environmental goods trade. Data indicate that developing countries have significant export strength and potential, not only in environmentally preferable products, but in many manufactured and chemical goods used in the provision of environmental services as well. For many developing countries, this latter class of goods includes some of their most dynamic exports, which can be significantly expanded by trade liberalisation, particularly through increased South-South trade. For other developing countries, trade liberalisation of environmentally preferable products may provide immediate gains needed to support rural economies and facilitate the integration of their small and medium sized enterprises into global supply chains. The study finds that to provide gains for all countries – each with a unique production and export profile – the scope and spectrum of environmental goods targeted for liberalisation must be wide and selective, allowing developing countries to select a limited ‘best- fit’ subset of goods for their tariff reduction commitments within an eventual WTO agreement.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Hamwey, 2005. "Environmental Goods: Where Do the Dynamic Trade Opportunities for Developing Countries Lie?," International Trade 0512015, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0512015
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 21
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/it/papers/0512/0512015.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. ZhongXiang Zhang, 2013. "Trade in environmental goods, with focus on climate-friendly goods and technologies," Chapters,in: Research Handbook on Environment, Health and the WTO, chapter 19, pages 673-699 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2009. "Liberalizing climate-friendly goods and technologies in WTO environmental goods negotiations: product coverage, modalities, challenges and the way forward," MPRA Paper 16943, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Aug 2009.
    3. Estelle, Gozlan & Ramos, Maria Priscila, 2007. "Not in Your Backyard? Selective Tariff Cuts for Environmentally Preferable Products," Working Papers 7031, TRADEAG - Agricultural Trade Agreements.
    4. Felix Groba, 2014. "Determinants of trade with solar energy technology components: evidence on the porter hypothesis?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(5), pages 503-526, February.
    5. Algieri, Bernardina & Aquino, Antonio & Succurro, Marianna, 2011. "Going “green”: trade specialisation dynamics in the solar photovoltaic sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7275-7283.
    6. Felix Groba & Jing Cao, 2015. "Chinese Renewable Energy Technology Exports: The Role of Policy, Innovation and Markets," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 60(2), pages 243-283, February.
    7. Bouwe R. Dijkstra & Anuj J. Mathew, "undated". "Liberalizing Trade in Environmental Goods," Discussion Papers 10/05, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    8. Qi He & Hong Fang & Miao Wang & Bo Peng, 2015. "Trade liberalization and trade performance of environmental goods: evidence from Asia-Pacific economic cooperation members," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(29), pages 3021-3039, June.
    9. Solveig Delabroye, 2014. "The Eco-Industry and Trade Agreements," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-45, CIRANO.
    10. World Bank, 2007. "International trade and Climate Change : Economic, Legal, and Institutional Perspectives," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6831, July.
    11. LaFleur, Marcelo, 2011. "The liberalization of environmental goods and services: overview and implications for Latin America and the Caribbean," Comercio Internacional 111, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    12. Bouwe R. Dijkstra & Anuj J. Mathew, 2016. "Liberalizing trade in environmental goods and services," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 18(4), pages 499-526, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade liberalisation; environmental goods; developing countries; WTO; negotiations;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business

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