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Money and Capital in a Persistent Liquidity Trap

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  • Bacchetta, Philippe
  • Benhima, Kenza
  • Kalantzis, Yannick

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the implications of a persistent liquidity trap in a monetary model with asset scarcity and price flexibility. We show that a liquidity trap leads to an increase in cash holdings and may be associated with a long-term output decline. This long-term impact is a supply-side effect that may arise when agents are heterogeneous. It occurs in particular with a persistent deleveraging shock, leading investors to hold cash yielding a low return. Policy implications differ from shorter-run analyses. Quantitative easing leads to a deeper liquidity trap. Exiting the trap by increasing expected inflation or applying negative interest rates does not solve the asset scarcity problem.

Suggested Citation

  • Bacchetta, Philippe & Benhima, Kenza & Kalantzis, Yannick, 2016. "Money and Capital in a Persistent Liquidity Trap," CEPR Discussion Papers 11369, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11369
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    Cited by:

    1. Lukas Altermatt, 2017. "Inside money, investment, and unconventional monetary policy," ECON - Working Papers 247, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Jul 2019.
    2. Keshav Dogra & Sushant Acharya, 2017. "The Side Effects of Safe Asset Creation," 2017 Meeting Papers 1453, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Andrea Caggese & Ander Perez, 2017. "Capital Misallocation and Secular Stagnation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-009, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    4. Ricardo J. Caballero & Alp Simsek, 2017. "A Risk-centric Model of Demand Recessions and Speculation," NBER Working Papers 23614, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Vladimir Asriyan & Luca Fornaro & Alberto Martin & Jaume Ventura, 2016. "Monetary policy for a bubbly world," Economics Working Papers 1533, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jun 2019.
    6. Philippe Bacchetta, 2018. "The sovereign money initiative in Switzerland: an economic assessment," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 154(1), pages 1-16, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asset scarcity; Deleveraging; liquidity trap; zero lower bound;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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