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Educational Inequality and Public Policy Preferences: Evidence from Representative Survey Experiments

Author

Listed:
  • Lergetporer, Philipp

    (ifo Institute at the University of Munich; CESifo)

  • Werner, Katharina

    (ifo Institute at the University of Munich)

  • Woessmann, Ludger

    (University of Munich and ifo Institute; CESifo, IZA, and CAGE)

Abstract

To study how information about educational inequality affects public concerns and policy preferences, we devise survey experiments in representative samples of the German population. Providing information about the extent of educational inequality strongly increases concerns about educational inequality but only slightly affects support for equity-oriented education policies, which is generally high. The small treatment effects are not due to respondents’ failure to connect policies with educational inequality or aversion against government interventions. Support for compulsory preschool is the one policy with a strong positive information treatment effect, which is increased further by informing about policy effectiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Lergetporer, Philipp & Werner, Katharina & Woessmann, Ludger, 2018. "Educational Inequality and Public Policy Preferences: Evidence from Representative Survey Experiments," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 391, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cge:wacage:391
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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Lergetporer & Marc Piopiunik & Lisa Simon, 2017. "Does the Education Level of Refugees Affect Natives' Attitudes?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6832, CESifo.
    2. Grewenig, Elisabeth & Lergetporer, Philipp & Simon, Lisa & Werner, Katharina & Woessmann, Ludger, 2018. "Can Online Surveys Represent the Entire Population?," IZA Discussion Papers 11799, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Philipp Lergetporer & Katharina Werner & Ludger Woessmann, 2017. "Public Opinion on Education Policy in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 6602, CESifo.
    4. Falch, Ranveig, 2021. "How Do People Trade Off Resources Between Quick and Slow Learners?," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 5/2021, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    5. Ranveig Falch, 2021. "How Do People Trade Off Resources Between Quick and Slow Learners?," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2021_04, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    6. Lee Elliot Major & Andrew Eyles & Stephen Machin, 2021. "Unequal learning and labour market losses in the crisis: consequences for social mobility," CEP Discussion Papers dp1748, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Cattaneo, Maria & Lergetporer, Philipp & Schwerdt, Guido & Werner, Katharina & Woessmann, Ludger & Wolter, Stefan C., 2020. "Information provision and preferences for education spending: Evidence from representative survey experiments in three countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    8. Elisabeth Grewenig & Philipp Lergetporer & Katharina Werner, 2020. "Gender Norms and Labor-Supply Expectations: Experimental Evidence from Adolescents," CESifo Working Paper Series 8611, CESifo.
    9. Maria Alejandra Cattaneo & Stefan C. Wolter, 2021. ""Against all odds" Does awareness of the risk of failure matter for educational choices?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0181, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    10. Elisabeth Grewenig & Sarah Kersten & Franziska Kugler & Philipp Lergetporer & Franziska Werner & Ludger Wößmann & Katharina Werner, 2019. "Was die Deutschen über Bildungsungleichheit denken," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 72(17), August.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    inequality; education; information; survey experiment JEL Classification: D30; H52; I24; H11; D63; D83; D72; P16;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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