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Information Provision and Preferences for Education Spending: Evidence from Representative Survey Experiments in Three Countries

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  • Maria Alejandra Cattaneo
  • Philipp Lergetporer
  • Guido Schwerdt
  • Katharina Werner
  • Ludger Woessmann
  • Stefan C. Wolter

Abstract

Do differences in citizens' policy preferences hamper international cooperation in education policy? To gain comparative evidence on public preferences for education spending, we conduct representative experiments with information treatments in Switzerland using identical survey techniques previously used in Germany and the United States. In Switzerland, providing information about actual spending and salary levels reduces support for increased education spending from 54 to 40 percent and for increased teacher salaries from 27 to 19 percent, respectively. The broad patterns of education policy preferences are similar across the three countries when the role of status-quo and information are taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Alejandra Cattaneo & Philipp Lergetporer & Guido Schwerdt & Katharina Werner & Ludger Woessmann & Stefan C. Wolter, 2019. "Information Provision and Preferences for Education Spending: Evidence from Representative Survey Experiments in Three Countries," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0163, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0163
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lergetporer, Philipp & Werner, Katharina & Woessmann, Ludger, 2020. "Educational inequality and public policy preferences: Evidence from representative survey experiments," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 188(C).
    2. Maria Alejandra Cattaneo & Stefan C. Wolter, 2021. ""Against all odds" Does awareness of the risk of failure matter for educational choices?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0181, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    policy preferences; cross-country comparison; international cooperation; Switzerland; Germany; United States; education spending; information; survey experiments;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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