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Education, Political Discontent, and Emigration Intentions: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Turkey

Author

Listed:
  • Z. Eylem Gevrek
  • Pinar Kunt
  • Heinrich Ursprung

Abstract

We exploit the 1997 school reform that increased compulsory schooling from 5 to 8 years to investigate the causal effect of education on emigration intentions. Our IV estimates indicate that an additional year of schooling increases the probability of reporting the intention to emigrate by 24 percentage points. Moreover, we provide evidence that the identified effect of education on emigration intentions does not operate through financial dissatisfaction but rather through displeasure at a bleak political environment that better educated people are more keenly aware of.

Suggested Citation

  • Z. Eylem Gevrek & Pinar Kunt & Heinrich Ursprung, 2019. "Education, Political Discontent, and Emigration Intentions: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Turkey," CESifo Working Paper Series 7710, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7710
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp7710.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; migration; political discontent;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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