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Immigration and Globalization: A Review Essay

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  • George J. Borjas

Abstract

This essay revisits the argument that the removal of worldwide immigration restrictions would induce a very large increase in world GDP. The recent books Exodus: How Migration is Changing Our World by Paul Collier and The Price of Rights: Regulating International Labor Migration by Martin Ruhs raise a number of questions about the underlying economic model. The essay shows how these concerns can greatly attenuate the predicted gains. (JEL F22, F66, J11, J18, J61)

Suggested Citation

  • George J. Borjas, 2015. "Immigration and Globalization: A Review Essay," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(4), pages 961-974, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:53:y:2015:i:4:p:961-74
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jel.53.4.961
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Kennan & James R. Walker, 2011. "The Effect of Expected Income on Individual Migration Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 211-251, January.
    2. Jess Benhabib & Boyan Jovanovic, 2012. "Optimal Migration: A World Perspective," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 53(2), pages 321-348, May.
    3. Hamilton, Bob & Whalley, John, 1984. "Efficiency and distributional implications of global restrictions on labour mobility : Calculations and policy implications," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 61-75.
    4. Bertoli, S. & Fernández-Huertas Moraga, J. & Ortega, F., 2013. "Crossing the border: Self-selection, earnings and individual migration decisions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 75-91.
    5. Erhan Artuç & Shubham Chaudhuri & John McLaren, 2010. "Trade Shocks and Labor Adjustment: A Structural Empirical Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 1008-1045, June.
    6. Walmsley, Terrie L. & Winters, L. Alan, 2005. "Relaxing the Restrictions on the Temporary Movement of Natural Persons: A Simulation Analysis," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 20, pages 688-726.
    7. Moses, Jonathon W. & Letnes, Bjorn, 2004. "The Economic Costs to International Labor Restrictions: Revisiting the Empirical Discussion," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 1609-1626, October.
    8. Michael A. Clemens, 2011. "Economics and Emigration: Trillion-Dollar Bills on the Sidewalk?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 83-106, Summer.
    9. Klein Paul & Ventura Gustavo J, 2007. "TFP Differences and the Aggregate Effects of Labor Mobility in the Long Run," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-38, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Docquier, Frédéric & Turati, Riccardo & Valette, Jérôme & Vasilakis, Chrysovalantis, 2018. "Birthplace Diversity and Economic Growth: Evidence from the US States in the Post-World War II Period," IZA Discussion Papers 11802, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Rodrik, Dani, 2017. "Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality?," Working Paper Series rwp17-003, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Marco Delogu & Frédéric Docquier & Joël Machado, 2018. "Globalizing labor and the world economy: the role of human capital," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 223-258, June.
    4. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier & Ismaël Issifou, 2018. "Migration And Institutions: Exit And Voice (From Abroad)?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 727-766, July.
    5. Massimiliano Bratti & Luca De Benedictis & Gianluca Santoni, 2020. "Immigrant entrepreneurs, diasporas, and exports," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(2), pages 249-272, March.
    6. Frédéric Docquier & Riccardo Turati & Jérôme Valette & Chrysovalantis Vasilakis, 2016. "Multiculturalism and Growth: Skill-Specific Evidence from the Post-World War II Period," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016028, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    7. Biavaschi, Costanza & Burzyński, Michał & Elsner, Benjamin & Machado, Joël, 2020. "Taking the skill bias out of global migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(C).
    8. Nejad, Maryam Naghsh & Young, Andrew T., 2016. "Want freedom, will travel: Emigrant self-selection according to institutional quality," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 45(S), pages 71-84.
    9. Clemens, Michael A. & Pritchett, Lant, 2019. "The new economic case for migration restrictions: An assessment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 153-164.
    10. Aubry, Amandine & Burzyński, Michał & Docquier, Frédéric, 2016. "The welfare impact of global migration in OECD countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 1-21.
    11. Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2019. "Free Movement, Open Borders and the Global Gains from Labor Mobility," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1904, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    12. Ryan H. Murphy, 2019. "The state economic modernity index: an index of state building, state size and scope, and state economic power," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 73-101, March.
    13. Benjamin Powell, 2019. "Solving the Misesian migration conundrum," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 32(3), pages 205-213, September.
    14. Costanza Biavaschi & Michal Burzynski & Benjamin Elsner & Joël Machado, 2016. "The Gain from the Drain - Skill-biased Migration and Global Welfare," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1624, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    15. Azarnert, Leonid V., 2019. "Migration, Congestion, And Growth," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(8), pages 3035-3064, December.
    16. Alexandre Padilla & Nicolás Cachanosky & Jonathan Beck, 2020. "Immigration and Economic Freedom: Does Education Matter?," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 35(Spring 20), pages 29-57.
    17. Forrester, Andrew C. & Powell, Benjamin & Nowrasteh, Alex & Landgrave, Michelangelo, 2019. "Do immigrants import terrorism?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 529-543.
    18. Biavaschi, Costanza & Burzyński, Michał & Elsner, Benjamin & Machado, Joël, 2020. "Taking the skill bias out of global migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(C).
    19. Alexandre Padilla & Nicolás Cachanosky, 2018. "The Grecian horse: does immigration lead to the deterioration of American institutions?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(3), pages 351-405, March.
    20. Z. Eylem Gevrek & Pinar Kunt & Heinrich Ursprung, 2019. "Education, Political Discontent, and Emigration Intentions: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Turkey," CESifo Working Paper Series 7710, CESifo.
    21. Powell, Benjamin & Clark, J.R. & Nowrasteh, Alex, 2017. "Does mass immigration destroy institutions? 1990s Israel as a natural experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 83-95.
    22. Benjamin Powell, 2016. "The economics of immigration: An Austrian contribution," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 343-349, December.
    23. Eszter Siposné Nándori & Zsuzsanna Dabasi-Halász & Csaba Ilyés, 2018. "“Action and Reaction” – the Impact of European Youth Mobility on the Economy and the Labour Market," Eastern European Business and Economics Journal, Eastern European Business and Economics Studies Centre, vol. 4(1 - speci), pages 56-78.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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