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Explaining emigration intentions and behaviour in the Netherlands, 2005-10

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  • Hendrik P. van Dalen
  • Kène Henkens

Abstract

We examined the emigration intentions of native-born Dutch residents and their subsequent emigration behaviour from 2005 to 2010. Data were collected from two surveys on emigration intentions, one conducted locally and one nationally. A number of novel results stand out. First, intentions were good predictors of future emigration: 34 per cent of those who had stated an intention to emigrate actually emigrated within the 5-year follow-up period. Second, the personality of potential migrants and their discontent with the quality of the public domain in the Netherlands (e.g., crowded space and inadequate access to unspoilt nature, pollution, crime level, mentality of people) were the strongest contributors to the motivation to move abroad. Third, the main difference between movers and those who stated intentions to emigrate but had not (yet) followed through was their state of health: healthy people were more likely to follow through with their migration intentions than those in poorer health.

Suggested Citation

  • Hendrik P. van Dalen & Kène Henkens, 2013. "Explaining emigration intentions and behaviour in the Netherlands, 2005-10," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(2), pages 225-241, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:rpstxx:v:67:y:2013:i:2:p:225-241
    DOI: 10.1080/00324728.2012.725135
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. François-Charles Wolff, 2015. "Do the Return Intentions of French Migrants Affect Their Transfer Behaviour?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(10), pages 1358-1373, October.
    2. Laetitia Duval & François-Charles Wolff, 2016. "Emigration intentions of Roma: evidence from Central and South-East Europe," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(1), pages 87-107, January.
    3. Nikolova, Milena & Graham, Carol, 2015. "In transit: The well-being of migrants from transition and post-transition countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 164-186.
    4. Artjoms Ivlevs, 2014. "Happy moves? Assessing the impact of subjective well-being on the emigration decision," Working Papers 20141402, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0622-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Guido, Friebel & Miriam, Manchin & Mariapia, Mendola & Giovanni, Prarolo, 2017. "Human Smuggling and Intentions to Migrate: Global Evidence from a Supply Shock along Africa-to-Europe Migration Routes," Working Papers 375, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised 06 Dec 2017.
    7. Duval, Laetitia & Wolff, François-Charles, 2015. "Ethnicity and remittances: Evidence from Kosovo," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 334-349.

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