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The role of maternal education in child health: Evidence from a compulsory schooling law

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  • Güneş, Pınar Mine

Abstract

This paper explores the effect of maternal education on child health and the channels in which education operates by exploiting a change in the compulsory schooling law (CSL) in Turkey. In order to account for the endogeneity of education, variation across cohorts induced by the timing of the CSL and variation across provinces by the intensity of additional classrooms constructed in the mother’s birth provinces is used as an instrumental variable. The results indicate that mother’s primary school completion improves infant health, as measured by very low birth weight, and child health, as measured by height-for-age and weight-for-age z-scores, even after controlling for many potential confounding factors. This paper also demonstrates that maternal education leads to earlier preventive care initiation, reduces smoking, reduces fertility, and increases age at first birth.

Suggested Citation

  • Güneş, Pınar Mine, 2015. "The role of maternal education in child health: Evidence from a compulsory schooling law," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 1-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:47:y:2015:i:c:p:1-16
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.02.008
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    Cited by:

    1. Marshall Makate, 2016. "Education Policy and Under-Five Survival in Uganda: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(4), pages 1-17, October.
    2. Makate, Marshall & Makate, Clifton, 2016. "The causal effect of increased primary schooling on child mortality in Malawi: Universal primary education as a natural experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 72-83.
    3. repec:eee:socmed:v:183:y:2017:i:c:p:56-61 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Murat G. Kırdar & Meltem Dayıoğlu & İsmet Koç, 2018. "The Effects of Compulsory-Schooling Laws on Teenage Marriage and Births in Turkey," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(4), pages 640-668.
    5. Z. Eylem Gevrek & Pinar Kunt & Heinrich Ursprung, 2019. "Education, Political Discontent, and Emigration Intentions: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Turkey," CESifo Working Paper Series 7710, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Guldi, Melanie, 2016. "Title IX and the education of teen mothers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 103-116.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Maternal education; Compulsory schooling; Economic development; Child health; Instrumental variables; Turkey;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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