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What Drives Public Health Care Expenditure Growth? Evidence from Swiss Cantons, 1970-2012

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  • Braendle, Thomas

    () (University of Basel)

  • Colombier, Carsten

Abstract

A better understanding of the determinants of public health care expenditures is key to designing effective health policies. We integrate supply and demand-side determinants, factors from political economy and health policy reforms into an empirical analysis of the highly decentralized Swiss health care system. We compile a novel data set of the cantonal health care expenditure in Switzerland spanning the period 1970 - 2012. Using dynamic panel estimation methods, we find that per capita income, the unemployment rate and the share of foreigners are positively related to public health care expenditure growth. With regard to political economy aspects, public health care expenditures increase with the share of women elected to parliament. However, institutional restrictions for politicians, such as fiscal rules and mandatory fiscal referenda, do not appear to limit public health care expenditure growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Braendle, Thomas & Colombier, Carsten, 2015. "What Drives Public Health Care Expenditure Growth? Evidence from Swiss Cantons, 1970-2012," Working papers 2015/12, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2015/12
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    Cited by:

    1. Colombier, Carsten, 2016. "Population aging in healthcare - a minor issue? Evidence from Switzerland," FiFo Discussion Papers - Finanzwissenschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 16-3, University of Cologne, FiFo Institute for Public Economics.
    2. Thomas Braendle & Alois Stutzer, 2017. "Voters and Representatives: How Should Representatives Be Selected?," CREMA Working Paper Series 2017-05, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. repec:kap:itaxpf:v:24:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10797-016-9436-x is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public health care expenditure; Panel data; Fiscal rules; Political selection;

    JEL classification:

    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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