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Exploring the disparities of regional health care expenditures in Switzerland: some empirical evidence

  • Oliver Reich


  • Cornelia Weins
  • Claudia Schusterschitz
  • Magdalena Thöni
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal The European Journal of Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 193-202

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:13:y:2012:i:2:p:193-202
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    1. Hitiris, Theo & Posnett, John, 1992. "The determinants and effects of health expenditure in developed countries," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 173-181, August.
    2. Pedro Pita Barros, 1998. "The black box of health care expenditure growth determinants," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(6), pages 533-544.
    3. Andreas Werblow & Stefan Felder & Peter Zweifel, 2007. "Population ageing and health care expenditure: a school of 'red herrings'?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(10), pages 1109-1126.
    4. Luca Crivelli & Massimo Filippini & Ilaria Mosca, 2006. "Federalism and regional health care expenditures: an empirical analysis for the Swiss cantons," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 535-541.
    5. Di Matteo, Livio & Di Matteo, Rosanna, 1998. "Evidence on the determinants of Canadian provincial government health expenditures: 1965-1991," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 211-228, April.
    6. Magnussen, Jon & Hagen, Terje P. & Kaarboe, Oddvar M., 2007. "Centralized or decentralized? A case study of Norwegian hospital reform," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(10), pages 2129-2137, May.
    7. Kjeld M�ller Pedersen & Terkel Christiansen & Mickael Bech, 2005. "The Danish health care system: evolution - not revolution - in a decentralized system," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(S1), pages S41-S57.
    8. Felder, Stefan & Meier, Markus & Schmitt, Horst, 2000. "Health care expenditure in the last months of life," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 679-695, September.
    9. Mosca, Ilaria, 2006. "Is decentralisation the real solution?: A three country study," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 113-120, June.
    10. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Sogaard, Jes & Andersson, Fredrik & Jonsson, Bengt, 1992. "An econometric analysis of health care expenditure: A cross-section study of the OECD countries," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 63-84, May.
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