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The Electoral Dynamics of Human Development

Listed author(s):
  • Vítor Castro

    ()

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra and Economic Policies Research Unit (NIPE))

  • Rodrigo Martins

    ()

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra and Group for Monetary and Fiscal Studies (GEMF))

This paper analyses the impact of elections on the dynamics of human development in a panel of 82 countries over the period 1980-2013. The incidence of partisan and political support effects is also taken into account. A GMM estimator is employed in the empirical analysis and the results point out to the presence of an electoral cycle in the growth rate of human development. Majority governments also influence it, but no clear evidence is found regarding partisan effects. The electoral cycles have proved to be stronger in non-OECD countries, in countries with less frequent elections, with lower levels of income and human development, in presidential and non-plurality systems and in proportional representation regimes. They have also become more intense in this millennium.

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Paper provided by NIPE - Universidade do Minho in its series NIPE Working Papers with number 6/2016.

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Date of creation: 2016
Handle: RePEc:nip:nipewp:6/2016
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