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Did globalization restrict partisan politics? An empirical evaluation of social expenditures in a panel of OECD countries

  • Potrafke, Niklas

This paper evaluates empirically how, in the course of globalization, partisan politics affected social expenditures in a panel of OECD countries. I introduce an updated indicator of government ideology and investigate its interaction with the KOF index of globalization. Two basic results emerge: First, at times when globalization proceeded at an average pace, partisan politics had no effect on social expenditures, but leftist governments increased social expenditures when globalization was proceeding rapidly. Second, policies differed in the 1980s and 1990s: Leftist governments pursued expansionary policies in the 1980s. Yet partisan politics disappeared in the 1990s, but not because of globalization.

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Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Munich Reprints in Economics with number 19286.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Publication status: Published in Public Choice 1-2 140(2009): pp. 105-124
Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19286
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  1. Rogoff, Kenneth & Sibert, Anne, 1988. "Elections and Macroeconomic Policy Cycles," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 1-16, January.
  2. Belke, Ansgar & Potrafke, Niklas, 2012. "Does government ideology matter in monetary policy? A panel data analysis for OECD countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 1126-1139.
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  8. Axel Dreher, 2002. "Does Globalization Affect Growth?," Development and Comp Systems 0210004, EconWPA, revised 04 Feb 2003.
  9. Axel Dreher & Jan-Egbert Sturm & Heinrich W. Ursprung, 2006. "The impact of globalization on the composition of government expenditures: Evidence from panel data," KOF Working papers 06-141, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  10. Cameron A. Shelton, 2007. "The Size and Composition of Government Expenditure," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2007-002, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
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  13. Shelton, Cameron A., 2007. "The size and composition of government expenditure," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(11-12), pages 2230-2260, December.
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