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Business Cycles in Small, Open Economies: Evidence from Panel Data Between 1900 and 2013

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  • Wataru Miyamoto
  • Thuy Lan Nguyen

Abstract

Using a novel data set for 17 countries dating from 1900 to 2013, we characterize business cycles in both small developed and developing countries in a model with financial frictions and a common shock structure. We estimate the model jointly for these 17 countries using Bayesian methods. We find that financial frictions are an important feature for not only developing countries but also small developed countries. Furthermore, business cycles in both groups of countries are marked with trend productivity shocks. Common disturbances explain one-third of the fluctuations in small, open economies (both developed and developing), especially during important worldwide phenomena.

Suggested Citation

  • Wataru Miyamoto & Thuy Lan Nguyen, 2016. "Business Cycles in Small, Open Economies: Evidence from Panel Data Between 1900 and 2013," Staff Working Papers 16-48, Bank of Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:16-48
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark Aguiar & Gita Gopinath, 2007. "Emerging Market Business Cycles: The Cycle Is the Trend," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 69-102.
    2. Fernández, Andrés & González, Andrés & Rodríguez, Diego, 2018. "Sharing a ride on the commodities roller coaster: Common factors in business cycles of emerging economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 99-121.
    3. Schmitt-Grohe, Stephanie & Uribe, Martin, 2004. "Solving dynamic general equilibrium models using a second-order approximation to the policy function," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 755-775, January.
    4. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    5. Naoussi, Claude Francis & Tripier, Fabien, 2013. "Trend shocks and economic development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 29-42.
    6. Andrés Fernández & Adam Gulan, 2015. "Interest Rates, Leverage, and Business Cycles in Emerging Economies: The Role of Financial Frictions," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 153-188, July.
    7. Gregory, Allan W. & Head, Allen C., 1999. "Common and country-specific fluctuations in productivity, investment, and the current account," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 423-451, December.
    8. Emi Nakamura & Dmitriy Sergeyev & Jón Steinsson, 2017. "Growth-Rate and Uncertainty Shocks in Consumption: Cross-Country Evidence," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 1-39, January.
    9. Akinci, Ozge, 2014. "Financial Frictions and Macroeconomic Fluctuations in Emerging Economies," International Finance Discussion Papers 1120, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Andres Fernandez & Andres Gonzalez & Diego Rodriguez, 2015. "Sharing a Ride on the Commodities Roller Coaster; Common Factors in Business Cycles of Emerging Economies," IMF Working Papers 15/280, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Fernández, Andrés & Gulan, Adam, 2012. "Interest rates and business cycles in emerging economies : the role of financial frictions," Research Discussion Papers 23/2012, Bank of Finland.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Kuan-Jen & Chu, Angus C. & Lai, Ching-Chong, 2018. "Home production and small open economy business cycles," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 110-135.
    2. Pham, Binh T. & Sala, Hector & Silva, José I., 2018. "Growth and real business cycles in Vietnam and the ASEAN-5. Does the trend shock matter?," MPRA Paper 90297, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Steff De Visscher & Markus Eberhardt & Gerdie Everaert, 2017. "Measuring productivity and absorptive capacity evolution," Discussion Papers 2017-11, University of Nottingham, GEP.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business fluctuations and cycles; Economic models; International topics;

    JEL classification:

    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles
    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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