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“Job Accessibility, Employment and Job-Education Mismatch in the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona”

  • Antonio Di Paolo

    ()

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

  • Anna Matas

    ()

    (GEAP, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

  • Josep Lluís Raymond

    ()

    (GEAP, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

This paper analyses the effect of job accessibility by public and private transport on labour market outcomes in the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Beyond employment, we consider the effect of job accessibility on job-education mismatch, which represents a relevant aspect of job quality. We adopt a recursive system of equations that models car availability, employment and mismatch. Public transport accessibility appears as an exogenous variable in the three equations. Even though it may reflect endogenous residential sorting, falsification proofs suggest that the estimated effect of public transport accessibility is not entirely driven by the endogenous nature of residential decisions.

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File URL: http://www.ub.edu/irea/working_papers/2014/201419.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group in its series AQR Working Papers with number 201411.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: May 2014
Date of revision: May 2014
Handle: RePEc:aqr:wpaper:201411
Contact details of provider: Postal: Torre IV, Av. Diagonal 690, 08034 Barcelona
Phone: 934021824
Fax: 934021821
Web page: http://www.ub.edu/aqr/Email:


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  11. Aslund, Olof & Östh, John & Zenou, Yves, 2006. "How Important Is Access to Jobs? Old Question – Improved Answer," IZA Discussion Papers 2051, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  24. Casey B. Mulligan & Yona Rubinstein, 2008. "Selection, Investment, and Women's Relative Wages Over Time," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 123(3), pages 1061-1110, August.
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  26. Maria Fraga O. Martins, 2001. "Parametric and semiparametric estimation of sample selection models: an empirical application to the female labour force in Portugal," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 23-39.
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