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The role of geographic mobility in reducing education-job mismatches in the Netherlands

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  • Maud M. Hensen
  • M. Robert de Vries
  • Frank Cörvers

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the relationship between geographic mobility and education-job mismatch in the Netherlands. We focus on the role of geographic mobility in reducing the probability of graduates working (i) jobs below their education level; (ii) jobs outside their study field; (iii) part-time jobs; (iv) flexible jobs; or (v) jobs paid below the wage expected at the beginning of the career. For this purpose we use data on secondary and higher vocational education graduates in the period 1996-2001. We show that graduates who are mobile have higher probability of finding jobs at the acquired education level than those who are not. Moreover, mobile graduates have higher probability of finding full-time or permanent jobs. This suggests that mobility is sought to prevent not only having to take a job below the acquired education level, but also other education-job mismatches; graduates are spatially flexible particularly to ensure full-time jobs. Copyright (c) 2008 the author(s). Journal compilation (c) 2008 RSAI.

Suggested Citation

  • Maud M. Hensen & M. Robert de Vries & Frank Cörvers, 2009. "The role of geographic mobility in reducing education-job mismatches in the Netherlands," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(3), pages 667-682, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:88:y:2009:i:3:p:667-682
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    Cited by:

    1. Raúl Ramos & Esteban Sanromá, 2013. "Overeducation and Local Labour Markets in Spain," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 104(3), pages 278-291, July.
    2. Valentina Meliciani & Debora Radicchia, 2014. "Informal Network, Spatial Mobility and Overeducation in the Italian Labour Market," Working Papers 19, Birkbeck Centre for Innovation Management Research, revised Nov 2014.
    3. Valentina Meliciani & Debora Radicchia, 2016. "Informal networks, spatial mobility and overeducation in the Italian labour market," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(2), pages 513-535, March.
    4. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i::p:s91-s112 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Dijk, J. van & Broersma, L. & Edzes, A.J.E. & Venhorst, V.A, 2011. "Brain drain of brain gain? Hoger opgeleiden in grote steden in Nederland," Research Reports vavenhorst, University of Groningen, Urban and Regional Studies Institute (URSI).
    6. K. Newbold, 2012. "Migration and regional science: opportunities and challenges in a changing environment," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(2), pages 451-468, April.
    7. Marten Middeldorp, 2016. "Job access and the labor market entry and spatial mobility trajectories of higher education graduates in the Netherlands," ERSA conference papers ersa16p741, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Viktor Venhorst & Jouke Van Dijk & Leo Van Wissen, 2010. "Do The Best Graduates Leave The Peripheral Areas Of The Netherlands?," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 101(5), pages 521-537, December.
    9. Muge Adalet McGowan & Dan Andrews, 2015. "Skill Mismatch and Public Policy in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1210, OECD Publishing.
    10. repec:spr:ariqol:v:13:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11482-017-9521-z is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Maier, Michael F. & Sprietsma, Maresa, 2016. "Does it pay to move? Returns to regional mobility at the start of the career for tertiary education graduates," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-060, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    12. Kupets, Olga, 2016. "Education-job mismatch in Ukraine: Too many people with tertiary education or too many jobs for low-skilled?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 125-147.
    13. repec:bla:presci:v:95:y:2016:i:4:p:693-707 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Brigitte Waldorf & Seong Do Yun, 2016. "Labor migration and overeducation among young college graduates," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 36(2), pages 99-119, October.
    15. Carole Brunet & Nathalie Havet, 2011. "Homeownership and job-match quality in France," Working Papers 1131, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.

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