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Unemployment duration, city size, and the tightness of the labor market

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  • Détang-Dessendre, Cécile
  • Gaigné, Carl

Abstract

This paper attempts to determine whether residential location affects unemployment duration. Our analysis is based on a spatial job search framework that shows the importance of dissociating the role of travel time from physical distance in unemployment duration. The contribution of our study also stems from the development of skill-specific accessibility measures that take into account the spatial distribution of labor supply and demand. Our results show that physical distance and competition among searchers must be controlled for in order to understand the significant role of job access (measured in terms of travel time) in unemployment duration. Second, improvements in access raise the probability that persons living in urban fringes and rural areas will become employed. Third, for workers living in large urban centers, the relationship between location and unemployment duration is insignificant.

Suggested Citation

  • Détang-Dessendre, Cécile & Gaigné, Carl, 2009. "Unemployment duration, city size, and the tightness of the labor market," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 266-276, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:39:y:2009:i:3:p:266-276
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    Cited by:

    1. Mathieu Bunel & Elisabeth Tovar, 2014. "Key Issues in Local Job Accessibility Measurement: Different Models Mean Different Results," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 51(6), pages 1322-1338, May.
    2. Camilo Alberto Cárdenas Hurtado & María Alejandra Hernández Montes & Jhon Edwar Torres Gorron, 2015. "A Statistical Analysis of Heterogeneity on Labour Markets and Unemployment Rates in Colombia," REVISTA DESARROLLO Y SOCIEDAD, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE, August.
    3. Suárez Cano, Patricia & Mayor Fernández, Matías & Cueto Iglesias, Begoña, 2011. "How important is access to employment offices in Spain? An urban and non-urban perspective," INVESTIGACIONES REGIONALES - Journal of REGIONAL RESEARCH, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 21, pages 119-140.
    4. repec:spr:jlabre:v:38:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9247-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Emmanuel Duguet & David Gray & Yannick L'Horty & Loïc du Parquet & Pascale Petit, 2017. "Labor Market Effects of Urban Riots:an experimental assessment," TEPP Working Paper 2017-03, TEPP.
    6. Matthieu Bunel & Elisabeth Tovar, 2012. "Local Job Accessibility Measurement: When the Model Makes the Results. Methodological Contribution and Empirical Benchmarking on the Paris Region," EconomiX Working Papers 2012-22, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    7. Catalina Jordi & Miguel Manjón, 2014. "The determinants of urban (un)employment duration: evidence from Barcelona," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(2), pages 515-556, September.
    8. Rosa Sanchis-Guarner, 2012. "Driving Up Wages: The Effects of Road Construction in Great Britain," SERC Discussion Papers 0120, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    9. Camilo Alberto Cárdenas Hurtado & María Alejandra Hernández Montes & Jhon Edwar Torres Gorron, 2014. "An Exploratory Analysis of Heterogeneity on Regional Labour Markets and Unemployment Rates in Colombia: An MFACT approach," Borradores de Economia 802, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    10. Yip, Chi Man, 2011. "Size and The City: Productivity, Match Quality and Wage Inequality," MPRA Paper 31255, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Yannick L'Horty & Florent Sari, 2015. "Why are there so many long-term unemployed in Paris?," TEPP Working Paper 2015-01, TEPP.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unemployment duration Job accessibility Commuting time;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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