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The Chicken Wears No Skin: Ordering Effects in Elicitation of Willingness to Pay for Multiple Credence Attributes in Ethical and Novel Food Products

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  • Cash, Sean B.
  • Slade, Peter
  • Cranfield, John

Abstract

We investigate whether consumer preferences for food products embodying multiple credence attributes are easily satiated. Results from two treatments of an experiment suggest choices are not affected by the order in which attributes are presented. Initial evidence suggests diminishing marginal utility in the number of attributes included in food products embodying multiple credence attributes. However, further testing reveals that preferences are consistent with constant marginal utility in the number of product attributes, suggesting that preferences are not easily satiated.

Suggested Citation

  • Cash, Sean B. & Slade, Peter & Cranfield, John, 2013. "The Chicken Wears No Skin: Ordering Effects in Elicitation of Willingness to Pay for Multiple Credence Attributes in Ethical and Novel Food Products," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150364, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150364
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Livestock Production/Industries;

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