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Designing choice experiments with many attributes. An application to setting priorities for orthopaedic waiting lists

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  • Julia Witt

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic., Australia)

  • Anthony Scott

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic., Australia)

  • Richard H. Osborne

    (Centre for Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic., Australia)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to undertake a discrete choice experiment using a 'blocked attribute' design. To date in the health economics literature, most discrete choice experiments have used only a relatively small number of attributes due to concerns about task complexity, non-compensatory decision rules, simplicity of experimental designs, and the costs of surveys. This may lead to omitted variable bias and reduced explanatory power when attributes have been pre-selected from a longer list. There may be situations where it is desirable to include a longer list of attributes, such as attaching weights to quality-of-life instruments to obtain single index scores. We examine this issue in the context of attaching weights to a disease-specific quality-of-life instrument used to prioritise patients on orthopaedic waiting lists in Victorian hospitals. Eleven attributes are allocated across three separate experimental designs and the data pooled for analysis. Pooling is justified given the specific context of the study, including attempts to minimise the effect of unobserved heterogeneity across the three models when designing the study and collecting data. Blocked attribute designs may offer flexibility to researchers when it is not possible or desirable to reduce the number of attributes. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Julia Witt & Anthony Scott & Richard H. Osborne, 2009. "Designing choice experiments with many attributes. An application to setting priorities for orthopaedic waiting lists," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(6), pages 681-696.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:6:p:681-696
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1396
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joel Huber and Kenneth Train., 2000. "On the Similarity of Classical and Bayesian Estimates of Individual Mean Partworths," Economics Working Papers E00-289, University of California at Berkeley.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shah, Koonal K. & Tsuchiya, Aki & Wailoo, Allan J., 2015. "Valuing health at the end of life: A stated preference discrete choice experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 48-56.
    2. repec:spr:patien:v:11:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s40271-017-0263-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Riise, Julie & Hole, Arne Risa & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte & Skåtun, Diane, 2016. "GPs' implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 169-183.
    4. Esther Bekker-Grob & John Rose & Michiel Bliemer, 2013. "A Closer Look at Decision and Analyst Error by Including Nonlinearities in Discrete Choice Models: Implications on Willingness-to-Pay Estimates Derived from Discrete Choice Data in Healthcare," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 31(12), pages 1169-1183, December.
    5. Solans-Domènech, Maite & Adam, Paula & Tebé, Cristian & Espallargues, Mireia, 2013. "Developing a universal tool for the prioritization of patients waiting for elective surgery," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 118-126.
    6. Carlsen, Benedicte & Hole, Arne Risa & Kolstad, Julie Riise & Norheim, Ole Frithjof, 2012. "When you can’t have the cake and eat it too," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(11), pages 1964-1973.
    7. Michael Clark & Domino Determann & Stavros Petrou & Domenico Moro & Esther Bekker-Grob, 2014. "Discrete Choice Experiments in Health Economics: A Review of the Literature," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 32(9), pages 883-902, September.
    8. Cash, Sean B. & Slade, Peter & Cranfield, John, 2013. "The Chicken Wears No Skin: Ordering Effects in Elicitation of Willingness to Pay for Multiple Credence Attributes in Ethical and Novel Food Products," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150364, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Grisolía, José M. & Longo, Alberto & Hutchinson, George & Kee, Frank, 2015. "Applying Health Locus of Control and Latent Class Modelling to food and physical activity choices affecting CVD risk," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 1-10.
    10. Mandy Ryan & Karen Gerard & Gillian Currie, 2012. "Using Discrete Choice Experiments in Health Economics," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 41 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Alessandro Mengoni & Chiara Seghieri & Sabina Nuti, 2013. "The application of discrete choice experiments in health economics: a systematic review of the literature," Working Papers 201301, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna of Pisa, Istituto di Management.

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