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High-speed rail’s impact on the location of office employment within the Dutch Randstad area

  • Jasper Willigers

    ()

  • Han Floor

    ()

  • Bert Van Wee

    ()

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    With the upcoming implementation of high-speed railway infrastructure in the Netherlands, interest has arisen in the spatial-economic effects this might have. Experiences with high-speed rail outside the Netherlands have shown that effects at a local or regional level can be important, due to relocation of employment within regions and cities. This paper focuses on this issue by presenting the results of discrete choice models for office location choice. Both stated choice data and revealed choice data are used. The discrete location choice models give information on to what extent the introduction of high-speed rail in the Netherlands can change the attractiveness of individual cities within the Randstad area on the one hand and of places within these cities on the other hand. As accessibility is an important concept in this topic, attention is given to the specification of accessibility indicators. Hereby, distinction is made between centrality and connectivity. Centrality refers to the position of a location within the transport network and relative to possible origins and destinations. Potential accessibility indicators based on a spatial interaction model are used to represent centrality. Connectivity refers to how well a location is connected to a transport network. Indicators for connectivity are for example the distance to the nearest railway station or motorway access ramp and also the level-of-service provided, such as the train frequency at a station. Furthermore, the paper focuses on a segmentation of employment that reflects this paper’s purpose of studying the influence of (high-speed) rail on location choices. Whereas accessibility by car is relevant for location choices of all types of office employment, accessibility by rail in general and accessibility by high-speed rail in particular seem important to more distinct groups of office employment.

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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu-wien.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa05/papers/308.pdf
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    Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa05p308.

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    Date of creation: Aug 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p308
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    1. Daniel McFadden, 1977. "Modelling the Choice of Residential Location," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 477, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    2. Brownston, David & Bunch, David S. & Train, Kenneth, 1999. "Joint mixed logit models of stated and revealed preferences for alternative-fuel vehicles," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7rf7s3nx, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. R W Vickerman, 1974. "Accessibility, attraction, and potential: a review of some concepts and their use in determining mobility," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 6(6), pages 675-691, June.
    4. Kenneth Train, 2003. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Online economics textbooks, SUNY-Oswego, Department of Economics, number emetr2.
    5. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Rietveld, Piet, 1994. "Spatial economic impacts of transport infrastructure supply," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 329-341, July.
    7. Benedikt Mandel & Marc Gaudry & Werner Rothengatter, 1997. "A disaggregate Box-Cox Logit mode choice model of intercity passenger travel in Germany and its implications for high-speed rail demand forecasts," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 99-120.
    8. Sands, Brian D., 1993. "The Development Effects of High-Speed Rail Stations and Implications for California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt13t478sf, University of California Transportation Center.
    9. Kingsley E. Haynes, 1997. "Labor markets and regional transportation improvements: the case of high-speed trains An introduction and review," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 57-76.
    10. Roger Vickerman, 1997. "High-speed rail in Europe: experience and issues for future development," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 21-38.
    11. Hensher, David & Louviere, Jordan & Swait, Joffre, 1998. "Combining sources of preference data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1-2), pages 197-221, November.
    12. K. E. Haynes & C. Karlsson & U. Blum, 1997. "Introduction to the special issue The regional and urban effects of high-speed trains," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 1-20.
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