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GPs’ implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services

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  • Riise, Julie

    () (Department of Economics, University of Bergen)

  • Hole, Arne Risa

    () (Department of Economics, University of Sheffield)

  • Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    () (COHERE, University of Southern Denmark)

  • Skåtun, Diane

    () (Health Economics Research Unit, University of Aberdeen)

Abstract

We present results from an extensive discrete choice experiment, which was conducted in three countries (Norway, Scotland, England) with the aim of disclosing stated prescription behaviour in different decision making contexts and across different cost containment cultures. We show that GPs in all countries respond to information about societal costs, benefits and effectiveness, and that they make trade-offs between them. The UK GPs have higher willingness to accept costs when they can prescribe medicines that are cheaper or more preferred by the patient, while Norwegian GPs tend to have higher willingness to accept costs for attributes regarding effectiveness or the doctors’ experience, while. In general there is a lot of heterogeneity also within each country. We discuss the results from the DCE in the light of the GPs two conflicting agency roles and what we know about the incentive structures and cultures in the different countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Riise, Julie & Hole, Arne Risa & Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte & Skåtun, Diane, 2015. "GPs’ implicit prioritization through clinical choices – evidence from three national health services," Working Papers in Economics 02/15, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:bergec:2015_002
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 11th July 2016
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2016-07-11 16:00:36

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Prioritization; discrete choice Experiments; prescription behavior; GPs;

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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