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Consumer Preference And Demand For Organic Food: Evidence From A Vermont Survey

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Listed:
  • Wang, Qingbin
  • Sun, Junjie

Abstract

While organic farming has been identified as an effective way to improve food safety and environment quality, the adoption of organic production and processing is highly determined by the market demand for organic food products. To assess the market potential for organic apples and milk, a conjoint analysis is conducted in the state of Vermont to examine consumer evaluation of major product attributes and their tradeoffs. Results suggest that there is likely a significant niche market for organic apples and milk and many consumers, especially people who have purchased organic food products, are willing to pay more for organic apples and milk produced locally and certified by NOFA.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Qingbin & Sun, Junjie, 2003. "Consumer Preference And Demand For Organic Food: Evidence From A Vermont Survey," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22080, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22080
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Jans, Sharon & Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge, 2001. "The Economics Of Organic Farming In The U.S.: The Case Of Tomato Production," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20618, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    9. Reicks, Marla & Splett, Patricia & Fishman, Amy, 1999. "Shelf Labeling Of Organic Foods: Customer Response In Minnesota Grocery Stores," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-13, July.
    10. Govindasamy, Ramu & Italia, John & DeCongelio, Marc & Anderson, Karen & Barbour, Bruce, 2000. "Empirically Evaluating Grower Characteristics and Satisfaction with Organic Production," P Series 36738, Rutgers University, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics.
    11. Govindasamy, Ramu & DeCongelio, Marc & Italia, John & Barbour, Bruce & Anderson, Karen, 2001. "Empirically Evaluating Consumer Characteristics and Satisfaction with Organic Products," P Series 36736, Rutgers University, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Batte, Marvin T. & Hooker, Neal H. & Haab, Timothy C. & Beaverson, Jeremy, 2007. "Putting their money where their mouths are: Consumer willingness to pay for multi-ingredient, processed organic food products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 145-159, April.
    2. repec:ags:gewipr:260281 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Idda, Lorenzo & Madau, Fabio A. & Pulina, Pietro, 2008. "The Motivational Profile of Organic Food Consumers: a Survey of Specialized Stores Customers in Italy," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43946, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Dettmann, Rachael L., 2008. "Organic Produce: Who's Eating it? A Demographic Profile of Organic Produce Consumers," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6446, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    5. Owusu, Victor, 2012. "Assessing Consumer Willingness to Pay a Premium for Organic Food Product: Evidence from Ghana," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 123394, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Owusu, Victor & Owusu, Michael Anifori, 2010. "Measuring Market Potential for Fresh Organic Fruit and Vegetable in Ghana," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 95955, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    7. Li, Jinghan & Zepeda, Lydia & Gould, Brian W., 2007. "The Demand for Organic Food in the U.S.: An Empirical Assessment," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-16.
    8. Ngoulma, Jeannot, 2015. "Consumers’ willingness to pay for dairy products: what the studies say? A Meta-Analysis," MPRA Paper 65250, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Zepeda, Lydia & Griffith, Garry R. & Chang, Hui-Shung (Christie), 2004. "Issues and Research Needs of the Australian Organic Food Products Market," Working Papers 12924, University of New England, School of Economics.
    10. Durham, Catherine A., 2007. "The Impact of Environmental and Health Motivations on the Organic Share of Produce Purchases," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-17, October.
    11. Seidu, Ayuba & Seale, James, 2015. "Estimating Danish Consumers’ Preference for Organic Foods: Application of a Generalized Differential Demand System," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196809, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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