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Consumer Preference And Demand For Organic Food: Evidence From A Vermont Survey

  • Wang, Qingbin
  • Sun, Junjie
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    While organic farming has been identified as an effective way to improve food safety and environment quality, the adoption of organic production and processing is highly determined by the market demand for organic food products. To assess the market potential for organic apples and milk, a conjoint analysis is conducted in the state of Vermont to examine consumer evaluation of major product attributes and their tradeoffs. Results suggest that there is likely a significant niche market for organic apples and milk and many consumers, especially people who have purchased organic food products, are willing to pay more for organic apples and milk produced locally and certified by NOFA.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/22080
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    Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada with number 22080.

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    Date of creation: 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22080
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    1. Govindasamy, Ramu & Italia, John & DeCongelio, Marc & Anderson, Karen & Barbour, Bruce, 2000. "Empirically Evaluating Grower Characteristics and Satisfaction with Organic Production," P Series 36738, Rutgers University, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics.
    2. Lohr, Luanne, 1998. "Welfare Effects Of Eco-Label Proliferation: Too Much Of A Good Thing?," Faculty Series 16642, University of Georgia, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    3. McCluskey, Jill J., 1999. "A Game Theoretic Approach to Organic Foods: An Analysis of Asymmetric Information and Policy," 2000 Conference (44th), January 23-25, 2000, Sydney, Australia 123706, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    4. Green, Paul E & Srinivasan, V, 1978. " Conjoint Analysis in Consumer Research: Issues and Outlook," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 103-23, Se.
    5. Jans, Sharon & Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge, 2001. "The Economics Of Organic Farming In The U.S.: The Case Of Tomato Production," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20618, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Reicks, Marla & Splett, Patricia & Fishman, Amy, 1999. "Shelf Labeling Of Organic Foods: Customer Response In Minnesota Grocery Stores," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 30(2), July.
    7. Govindasamy, Ramu & DeCongelio, Marc & Italia, John & Barbour, Bruce & Anderson, Karen, 2001. "Empirically Evaluating Consumer Characteristics and Satisfaction with Organic Products," P Series 36736, Rutgers University, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics.
    8. Luanne Lohr, 1998. "Implications of Organic Certification for Market Structure and Trade," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(5), pages 1125-1129.
    9. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132.
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