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James Thornton

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Personal Details

First Name:James
Middle Name:
Last Name:Thornton
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RePEc Short-ID:pth230
Email:
Homepage:http://people.emich.edu/jthornton
Postal Address:
Phone:
Location: Ypsilanti, Michigan (United States)
Homepage: http://www.emich.edu/economics/
Email:
Phone: (734) 487-3395
Fax: (734) 487-9666
Postal: 703 Pray-Harrold Bldg, Ypsilanti, MI 48197
Handle: RePEc:edi:deemius (more details at EDIRC)
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  1. James Thornton & Marjorie L. Baldwin & William G. Johnson, . "An Analysis of Physician Career Decisions Using a Nested Logit Approach," Working Papers 9810, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
  1. James Thornton, 2011. "Does more medical care improve population health? New evidence for an old controversy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(24), pages 3325-3336.
  2. James Thornton & Jennifer Rice, 2008. "Determinants of healthcare spending: a state level analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(22), pages 2873-2889.
  3. James Thornton & Jennifer Rice, 2008. "Does extending health insurance coverage to the uninsured improve population health outcomes?," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 217-230, October.
  4. James Thornton & Fred Esposto, 2003. "How important are economic factors in choice of medical specialty?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 67-73.
  5. James Thornton, 2002. "Estimating a health production function for the US: some new evidence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 59-62.
  6. James Thornton, 2000. "Physician choice of medical specialty: do economic incentives matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(11), pages 1419-1428.
  7. James Thornton, 1999. "The impact of medical malpractice insurance cost on physician behaviour: the role of income and tort signal effects," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(7), pages 779-794.
  8. James Thornton, 1998. "Do physicians employ aides efficiently?: Some new evidence on solo practitioners," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 85-96, June.
  9. James Thornton, 1998. "The labour supply behaviour of self-employed solo practice physicians," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 85-94.
  10. Thornton, James, 1997. "Are malpractice insurance premiums a tort signal that influence physician hours worked?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 403-407, September.
  11. James Thornton & B. Kelly Eakin, 1997. "The Utility-Maximizing Self-Employed Physician," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(1), pages 98-128.

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