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Salient Gender Difference in the Wage Elasticity of General Practitioners' Labour Supply

  • Chunzhou Mu

    (School of Economics, the University of New South Wales and Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Technology Sydney)

  • Shiko Maruyama

    (ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, the University of New South Wales)

Recent years have witnessed a growing proportion of female general practitioners (GPs) worldwide. Because female GPs tend to work fewer hours than male GPs, this continuing trend may accelerate the shortage of GPs. This paper investigates the gender difference in the wage elasticity of Australian GPs by maximum likelihood estimation of labour supply and wage equations. Quantitative information regarding the labour supply responses of GPs is vital in designing eective policies. The results show salient gender difference. An increase in hourly wage increases the labour supply of male GPs and reduces the labour supply of female GPs, resulting in an enlarged gender dierence in labour supply. The results also suggest that family factors still remain a key driving force of the reduced labour supply of Australian female GPs.

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File URL: http://research.economics.unsw.edu.au/RePEc/papers/2013-16.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, The University of New South Wales in its series Discussion Papers with number 2013-16.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2013-16
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  1. Terence Chai Cheng & Anthony Scott & Sung‐Hee Jeon & Guyonne Kalb & John Humphreys & Catherine Joyce, 2012. "What Factors Influence The Earnings Of General Practitioners And Medical Specialists? Evidence From The Medicine In Australia: Balancing Employment And Life Survey," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(11), pages 1300-1317, November.
  2. Christopher Ferrall & Allan W. Gregory & William Tholl, 1998. "Endogenous Work Hours and Practice Patterns of Canadian Physicians," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 1-27, February.
  3. Rizzo, John A. & Blumenthal, David, 1994. "Physician labor supply: Do income effects matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 433-453.
  4. Thomas F. Crossley & Jeremiah Hurley & Sung-Hee Jeon, 2006. "Physician Labour Supply in Canada: a Cohort Analysis," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 410, McMaster University.
  5. Ohsfeldt, Robert L. & Culler, Steven D., 1986. "Differences in income between male and female physicians," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 335-346, December.
  6. Showalter, Mark H. & Thurston, Norman K., 1997. "Taxes and labor supply of high-income physicians," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 73-97, October.
  7. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 2004. "The Value of Life and the Rise in Health Spending," NBER Working Papers 10737, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Badi H. Baltagi & Espen Bratberg & Tor Helge Holmås, 2005. "A panel data study of physicians' labor supply: the case of Norway," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(10), pages 1035-1045.
  9. Stephen Morris & Matt Sutton & Hugh Gravelle & Bob Elliott & Arne Hole & Ada Ma & Bonnie Sibbald & Diane Skatun, 2008. "Determinants of General Practitioners' Wages in England," Working Papers 036cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  10. Gravelle, Hugh & Hole, Arne Risa & Santos, Rita, 2011. "Measuring and testing for gender discrimination in physician pay: English family doctors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 660-674, July.
  11. James Thornton & B. Kelly Eakin, 1997. "The Utility-Maximizing Self-Employed Physician," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(1), pages 98-128.
  12. Frank A. Sloan, 1975. "Physician supply behavior in the short run," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 28(4), pages 549-569, July.
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