IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ces/ceswps/_3802.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Do Medical Doctors Respond to Economic Incentives?

Author

Listed:
  • Leif Andreassen
  • Maria Laura Di Tommaso
  • Steinar Strøm

Abstract

A longitudinal analysis of married physicians labor supply is carried out on Norwegian data from 1997 to 1999. The model utilized for estimation implies that physicians can choose among 10 different job packages which are a combination of part time/full time, hospital/primary care, private/public sector, and not working. Their current choice is influenced by past available options due to a taste persistence parameter in the utility function. In the estimation we take into account the budget constraint, including all features of the tax system. Our results imply that an overall wage increase or a tax cut moves married physicians towards full time job packages, in particular to full time jobs in the private sector. But the overall and aggregate labor supply elasticities in the population of employed doctors are rather low compared to previous estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Leif Andreassen & Maria Laura Di Tommaso & Steinar Strøm, 2012. "Do Medical Doctors Respond to Economic Incentives?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3802, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3802
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp3802.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John K. Dagsvik & Steinar StrØm, 2006. "Sectoral labour supply, choice restrictions and functional form," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 803-826, September.
    2. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521766555, April.
    3. Badi H. Baltagi & Espen Bratberg & Tor Helge Holmås, 2005. "A panel data study of physicians' labor supply: the case of Norway," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(10), pages 1035-1045, October.
    4. Gjerberg, Elisabeth, 2001. "Medical women -- towards full integration? An analysis of the specialty choices made by two cohorts of Norwegian doctors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 331-343, February.
    5. Jostein Grytten & Fredrik Carlsen & Irene Skau, 2008. "Primary physicians’ response to changes in fees," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 9(2), pages 117-125, May.
    6. Geir Godager & Tor Iversen & Ching-To Ma, 2009. "Service motives and profit incentives among physicians," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 39-57, March.
    7. Midttun, Linda, 2007. "Private or public? An empirical analysis of the importance of work values for work sector choice among Norwegian medical specialists," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(6), pages 1265-1277, March.
    8. John K. Dagsvik, 2002. "Discrete Choice in Continuous Time: Implications of an Intertemporal Version of the Iia Property," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(2), pages 817-831, March.
    9. Rizzo, John A. & Blumenthal, David, 1994. "Physician labor supply: Do income effects matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 433-453.
    10. Divine Ikenwilo & Anthony Scott, 2007. "The effects of pay and job satisfaction on the labour supply of hospital consultants," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(12), pages 1303-1318, December.
    11. Showalter, Mark H. & Thurston, Norman K., 1997. "Taxes and labor supply of high-income physicians," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 73-97, October.
    12. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2005. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521848053, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andreassen, Leif & Di Tpmmaso, Maria Laura & Strøm, Steinar, 2014. "Wages Anatomy: Labor Supply of Nurses and a Comparison with Physicians," Memorandum 24/2014, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    2. Terence C. Cheng & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2015. "Attrition Bias in Panel Data: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing? A Case Study Based on the Mabel Survey," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1101-1117, September.
    3. Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce Shearer, 2021. "Labour supply, service intensity, and contracts: Theory and evidence on physicians," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 36(6), pages 686-702, September.
    4. Barbara Broadway & Guyonne Kalb & Jinhu Li & Anthony Scott, 2017. "Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After‐hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 52-66, December.
    5. Marilena Locatelli & Steinar Strøm, 2015. "Longitudinal Analysis of Generic Substitution," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 363-374, September.
    6. Francisco Costa & Letícia Nunes & Fábio Sanches, 2019. "How to Attract Physicians to Underserved Areas? Policy Recommendations from a Structural Model," Working Papers 01, Instituto de Estudos para Políticas de Saúde.
    7. Terence C. Cheng & Guyonne Kalb & Anthony Scott, 2018. "Public, private or both? Analyzing factors influencing the labour supply of medical specialists," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 51(2), pages 660-692, May.
    8. Kalb, Guyonne & Kühnle, Daniel & Scott, Anthony & Cheng, Terence Chai & Jeon, Sung-Hee, 2015. "What Factors Affect Doctors' Hours Decisions: Comparing Structural Discrete Choice and Reduced-Form Approaches," IZA Discussion Papers 9054, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Guyonne Kalb & Daniel Kuehnle & Anthony Scott & Terence Chai Cheng & Sung‐Hee Jeon, 2018. "What factors affect physicians' labour supply: Comparing structural discrete choice and reduced‐form approaches," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 101-119, February.
    10. Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce Shearer, 2019. "Labour Supply, Service Intensity and Contract Choice: Theory and Evidence on Physicians," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-02158484, HAL.
    11. Leif Andreassen & Maria Laura Tommaso & Steinar Strøm, 2017. "Nurses and physicians: a longitudinal analysis of mobility between jobs and labor supply," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(4), pages 1235-1269, June.
    12. Zhang, Xue & Sweetman, Arthur, 2018. "Blended capitation and incentives: Fee codes inside and outside the capitated basket," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 16-29.
    13. Choné, P. & Coudin, É. & Pla, A., 2014. "Are physician fees responsive to competition?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 14/20, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Johar, Meliyanni, 2010. "The effect of a public health card program on the supply of health care," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(10), pages 1527-1535, May.
    2. Terence C. Cheng & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2015. "Attrition Bias in Panel Data: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing? A Case Study Based on the Mabel Survey," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1101-1117, September.
    3. Barbara Broadway & Guyonne Kalb & Jinhu Li & Anthony Scott, 2017. "Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After‐hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 52-66, December.
    4. Kalb, Guyonne & Kühnle, Daniel & Scott, Anthony & Cheng, Terence Chai & Jeon, Sung-Hee, 2015. "What Factors Affect Doctors' Hours Decisions: Comparing Structural Discrete Choice and Reduced-Form Approaches," IZA Discussion Papers 9054, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Nicole Bosch & Miriam Gielen & Egbert Jongen & Mauro Mastrogiacomo (DNB & voorheen CPB), 2013. "A structural analysis of labour supply elasticities in the Netherlands," CPB Discussion Paper 235, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    6. Chunzhou Mu & Shiko Maruyama, 2013. "Salient Gender Difference in the Wage Elasticity of General Practitioners' Labour Supply," Discussion Papers 2013-16, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    7. Andreassen, Leif & Di Tpmmaso, Maria Laura & Strøm, Steinar, 2014. "Wages Anatomy: Labor Supply of Nurses and a Comparison with Physicians," Memorandum 24/2014, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    8. Jan Erik Askildsen & Tor Helge Holmås, 2013. "Wages and work conditions as determinants for physicians’ work decisions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 397-406, January.
    9. Leif Andreassen & Maria Laura Tommaso & Steinar Strøm, 2017. "Nurses and physicians: a longitudinal analysis of mobility between jobs and labor supply," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(4), pages 1235-1269, June.
    10. Terence Chai Cheng & Anthony Scott & Sung-Hee Jeon & Guyonne Kalb & John Humphreys & Catherine Joyce, 2010. "What Factors Influence the Earnings of GPs and Medical Specialists in Australia? Evidence from the MABEL Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2010n12, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    11. Qin, Xuezheng & Li, Lixing & Hsieh, Chee-Ruey, 2013. "Too few doctors or too low wages? Labor supply of health care professionals in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 150-164.
    12. Guyonne Kalb & Daniel Kuehnle & Anthony Scott & Terence Chai Cheng & Sung‐Hee Jeon, 2018. "What factors affect physicians' labour supply: Comparing structural discrete choice and reduced‐form approaches," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 101-119, February.
    13. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2016. "Labor Supply as a Choice Among Latent Jobs: Unobserved Heterogeneity and Identification," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(3), pages 487-506, April.
    14. Divine Ikenwilo & Anthony Scott, 2007. "The effects of pay and job satisfaction on the labour supply of hospital consultants," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(12), pages 1303-1318.
    15. Mauro Mastrogiacomo & Nicole M. Bosch & Miriam D. A. C. Gielen & Egbert L. W. Jongen, 2017. "Heterogeneity in Labour Supply Responses: Evidence from a Major Tax Reform," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(5), pages 769-796, October.
    16. Rolf Aaberge & Ugo Colombino, 2014. "Labour Supply Models," Contributions to Economic Analysis, in: Cathal O’Donoghue (ed.), Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling, volume 127, pages 167-221, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    17. Stefan Hochguertel & Henry Ohlsson, 2009. "Compensatory inter vivos gifts," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6), pages 993-1023.
    18. Lukas Kwietniewski & Mareike Heimeshoff & Jonas Schreyögg, 2017. "Estimation of a physician practice cost function," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(4), pages 481-494, May.
    19. Robert Turner, 2013. "Using contingent choice surveys to inform national park management," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 3(2), pages 120-138, June.
    20. Terence C. Cheng & Guyonne Kalb & Anthony Scott, 2018. "Public, private or both? Analyzing factors influencing the labour supply of medical specialists," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 51(2), pages 660-692, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    physicians' labor supply; multi-sector; panel data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3802. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Klaus Wohlrabe (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cesifde.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.