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What Factors Affect Doctors' Hours Decisions: Comparing Structural Discrete Choice and Reduced-Form Approaches

Author

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  • Kalb, Guyonne

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research)

  • Kühnle, Daniel

    (University of Duisburg-Essen)

  • Scott, Anthony

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research)

  • Cheng, Terence Chai

    (University of Adelaide)

  • Jeon, Sung-Hee

    (Statistics Canada)

Abstract

Few papers examine the pecuniary and non-pecuniary determinants of doctors' labour supply despite substantial predicted shortages in many OECD countries. We contribute to the literature by applying both a structural discrete choice and a reduced-form approach. Using detailed survey data for Australian physicians, we examine how these different modelling approaches affect estimated wage elasticities at the intensive margin. We show that all modelling approaches predict small negative wage elasticities for male and female General Practitioners (GPs) and specialists. Our detailed subgroup analysis does not reveal particularly strong responses to wage increases by any specific group. We show that the translog and Box-Cox utility functions outperform the quadratic utility function. Exploiting the advantages of the structural discrete choice model, we examine short-term effects at the intensive margin by calculating labour supply changes in response to 5 and 10% wage increases. The results show that such wage increases substantially reduce the full-time equivalent supply of male GPs, and to a lesser extent of male specialists and female GPs, but not of female specialists.

Suggested Citation

  • Kalb, Guyonne & Kühnle, Daniel & Scott, Anthony & Cheng, Terence Chai & Jeon, Sung-Hee, 2015. "What Factors Affect Doctors' Hours Decisions: Comparing Structural Discrete Choice and Reduced-Form Approaches," IZA Discussion Papers 9054, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9054
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Broadway & Guyonne Kalb & Jinhu Li & Anthony Scott, 2017. "Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After‐hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 52-66, December.
    2. Terence C. Cheng & Guyonne Kalb & Anthony Scott, 2018. "Public, private or both? Analyzing factors influencing the labour supply of medical specialists," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 51(2), pages 660-692, May.
    3. Megha Swami & Hugh Gravelle & Anthony Scott & Jenny Williams, 2018. "Hours worked by general practitioners and waiting times for primary care," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(10), pages 1513-1532, October.
    4. Swami, Megha & Scott, Anthony, 2021. "Impact of rural workforce incentives on access to GP services in underserved areas: Evidence from a natural experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 281(C).
    5. Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce Shearer, 2019. "Labour Supply, Service Intensity and Contract Choice: Theory and Evidence on Physicians," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-02158484, HAL.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    wage elasticity; discrete choice model; labour supply; health workforce; MABEL;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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