IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v30y1998i1p85-94.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The labour supply behaviour of self-employed solo practice physicians

Author

Listed:
  • James Thornton

Abstract

This paper investigates the empirical labour supply behaviour of self-employed solo practice physicians. The specification of the empirical labour supply equation is based on a model of constrained utility-maximizing behaviour that recognizes the physician makes work/leisure choices based on an endogenous shadow wage and faces a nonlinear budget constraint. The findings suggest that the typical self-employed solo practice male physician operates on the upward-sloping portion of the labour supply curve and is relatively unresponsive to changes in marginal hourly medical practice earnings and non-practice income.

Suggested Citation

  • James Thornton, 1998. "The labour supply behaviour of self-employed solo practice physicians," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 85-94.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:1:p:85-94 DOI: 10.1080/000368498326173
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/000368498326173
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    3. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    5. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
    6. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    7. Ellis W. Tallman, 1992. "Human capital investment and economic growth: new routes in theory address old questions," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Sep, pages 1-12.
    8. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1991. "The Allocation of Talent: Implications for Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 503-530.
    9. Engle, Robert F. & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1987. "Forecasting and testing in co-integrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 143-159, May.
    10. Richard R. Nelson & Edmond S. Phelps, 1965. "Investment in Humans, Technological Diffusion and Economic Growth," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 189, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    11. Paul M. Romer, 1987. "Crazy Explanations for the Productivity Slowdown," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1987, Volume 2, pages 163-210 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Tallman, E.W. & Wang, P., 1992. "Human Capital Investment and Economic Growth: New Routes in Theory and Address Old Questions," Papers 9-92-9, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
    13. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ingrid Verheul & Martin Carree & Roy Thurik, 2009. "Allocation and productivity of time in new ventures of female and male entrepreneurs," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 273-291, October.
    2. Thomas F. Crossley & Jeremiah Hurley & Sung-Hee Jeon, 2009. "Physician labour supply in Canada: a cohort analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 437-456.
    3. Broadway, Barbara & Kalb, Guyonne & Li, Jinhu & Scott, Anthony, 2016. "Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After-Hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model," IZA Discussion Papers 9910, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Sarma, Sisira & Devlin, Rose Anne & Belhadji, Bachir & Thind, Amardeep, 2010. "Does the way physicians are paid influence the way they practice? The case of Canadian family physicians' work activity," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(2-3), pages 203-217, December.
    5. Weeks, William B. & Paraponaris, Alain & Ventelou, Bruno, 2013. "Sex-based differences in income and response to proposed financial incentives among general practitioners in France," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 199-205.
    6. Kalb, Guyonne & Kühnle, Daniel & Scott, Anthony & Cheng, Terence Chai & Jeon, Sung-Hee, 2015. "What Factors Affect Doctors' Hours Decisions: Comparing Structural Discrete Choice and Reduced-Form Approaches," IZA Discussion Papers 9054, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Isabelle Clerc & Olivier L’Haridon & Alain Paraponaris & Camelia Protopopescu & Bruno Ventelou, 2012. "Fee-for-service payments and consultation length in general practice: a work--leisure trade-off model for French GPs," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(25), pages 3323-3337, September.
    8. David Rudoler & Raisa Deber & Janet Barnsley & Richard H. Glazier & Adrian Rohit Dass & Audrey Laporte, 2015. "Paying for Primary Care: The Factors Associated with Physician Self‐selection into Payment Models," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1229-1242, September.
    9. Sung-Hee Jeon & Jeremiah Hurley, 2010. "Physician Resource Planning in Canada: The Need for a Stronger Behavioural Foundation," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-375, September.
    10. Pham, Mai & McRae, Ian, 2015. "Who provides GP after-hours care?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(4), pages 447-455.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:1:p:85-94. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.