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Endogenous Work Hours and Practice Patterns of Canadian Physicians

Author

Listed:
  • Christopher Ferrall
  • Allan W. Gregory
  • William Tholl

Abstract

Using an extensive survey of Canadian physicians, the authors study how physician practice patterns are shaped by demographic characteristics, physician specialty, and government policy. They model the simultaneous determination of group size, primary source of professional income (fee-for-service or salaried position), weekly hours of direct patient care, and total weekly hours of work. Employing a method of maximum simulated likelihood, the coefficients are precisely identified. With all else constant in the model, physicians who work under fee-for-service see patients 5.9 more hours each week than physicians who are primarily salaried, yet fee-for-service physicians work 5.5 hours less per week in total.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Ferrall & Allan W. Gregory & William Tholl, 1998. "Endogenous Work Hours and Practice Patterns of Canadian Physicians," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 1-27, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:31:y:1998:i:1:p:1-27
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Badi H. Baltagi & Espen Bratberg & Tor Helge Holmås, 2005. "A panel data study of physicians' labor supply: the case of Norway," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(10), pages 1035-1045.
    2. repec:clh:resear:v:2:y:2009:i:5 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Échevin, Damien & Fortin, Bernard, 2014. "Physician payment mechanisms, hospital length of stay and risk of readmission: Evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 112-124.
    4. Sung-Hee Jeon & Jeremiah Hurley, 2010. "Physician Resource Planning in Canada: The Need for a Stronger Behavioural Foundation," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-375, September.
    5. Thomas F. Crossley & Jeremiah Hurley & Sung-Hee Jeon, 2009. "Physician labour supply in Canada: a cohort analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 437-456.
    6. Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce Shearer, 2008. "Policy Analysis in the Health-Services Market: Accounting for Quality and Quantity," Cahiers de recherche 0807, CIRPEE.
    7. Chunzhou Mu & Shiko Maruyama, 2013. "Salient Gender Difference in the Wage Elasticity of General Practitioners' Labour Supply," Discussion Papers 2013-16, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    8. Sarma, Sisira & Thind, Amardeep & Chu, Man-Kee, 2011. "Do new cohorts of family physicians work less compared to their older predecessors? The evidence from Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(12), pages 2049-2058, June.
    9. Sarma, Sisira & Devlin, Rose Anne & Belhadji, Bachir & Thind, Amardeep, 2010. "Does the way physicians are paid influence the way they practice? The case of Canadian family physicians' work activity," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(2-3), pages 203-217, December.
    10. McDonald, James Ted & Worswick, Christopher, 2012. "The migration decisions of physicians in Canada: The roles of immigrant status and spousal characteristics," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(9), pages 1581-1588.
    11. Damien Échevin & Bernard Fortin, 2011. "Physician Payment Mechanisms, Hospital Length of Stay and Risk of Readmission: a Natural Experiment," CIRANO Working Papers 2011s-44, CIRANO.
    12. Alexandra Constant & Pierre Thomas Léger, 2008. "Estimating differences between male and female physician service provision using panel data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(11), pages 1295-1315.
    13. Qin, Xuezheng & Li, Lixing & Hsieh, Chee-Ruey, 2013. "Too few doctors or too low wages? Labor supply of health care professionals in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 150-164.
    14. Di Matteo, Livio, 2014. "Physician numbers as a driver of provincial government health spending in Canadian health policy," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 18-35.
    15. Iversen, Tor, 2004. "The effects of a patient shortage on general practitioners' future income and list of patients," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 673-694, July.
    16. Michael Benarroch & Hugh Grant, 2004. "The interprovincial migration of Canadian physicians: does income matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(20), pages 2335-2345.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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