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International mortality modelling—An economic perspective

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  • French, Declan

Abstract

A recent literature has developed on modelling mortality in multiple populations together. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a reason why mortality in different populations may be related based on an economic literature on technology and knowledge diffusion.

Suggested Citation

  • French, Declan, 2014. "International mortality modelling—An economic perspective," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 182-186.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:122:y:2014:i:2:p:182-186
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.10.039
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nan Li & Ronald Lee, 2005. "Coherent mortality forecasts for a group of populations: An extension of the lee-carter method," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(3), pages 575-594, August.
    2. James Thornton, 2002. "Estimating a health production function for the US: some new evidence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 59-62.
    3. Papageorgiou, Chris & Savvides, Andreas & Zachariadis, Marios, 2007. "International medical technology diffusion," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 409-427, July.
    4. Jonathan Skinner & Douglas Staiger, 2015. "Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth in Health Care," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(5), pages 951-964, December.
    5. Adrian Raftery & Jennifer Chunn & Patrick Gerland & Hana Ševčíková, 2013. "Bayesian Probabilistic Projections of Life Expectancy for All Countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(3), pages 777-801, June.
    6. Dowd, Kevin & Cairns, Andrew & Blake, David & Coughlan, Guy & Khalaf-Allah, Marwa, 2011. "A gravity model of mortality rates for two related populations," MPRA Paper 35738, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Diego A. Comin & Bart Hobijn, 2009. "The CHAT Dataset," Harvard Business School Working Papers 10-035, Harvard Business School.
    8. Diego Comin & Bart Hobijn & Emilie Rovito, 2008. "Technology usage lags," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 237-256, December.
    9. Carter, Lawrence R. & Lee, Ronald D., 1992. "Modeling and forecasting US sex differentials in mortality," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 393-411, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dominik Paprotny, 2016. "Measuring Central and Eastern Europe’s Socio-Economic Development Using Time Lags," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 939-957, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mortality; Technology; Diffusion;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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