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Paul Scuffham

Personal Details

First Name:Paul
Middle Name:
Last Name:Scuffham
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc790
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Centre for Applied Research in Health Economics
Griffith University

Brisbane, Australia
https://www.healtheconomics.com.au/

:


RePEc:edi:chgriau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Nerina Vecchio & Paul A. Scuffham & Michael Hilton & Harvey A. Whiteford, 2010. "Work-related injury among the nursing profession: An investigation of modifiable factors," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201005, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.

Articles

  1. Haitham W. Tuffaha & Paul A. Scuffham, 2018. "The Australian Managed Entry Scheme: Are We Getting it Right?," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 36(5), pages 555-565, May.
  2. Harris, Paul & Whitty, Jennifer A. & Kendall, Elizabeth & Ratcliffe, Julie & Wilson, Andrew & Littlejohns, Peter & Scuffham, Paul A., 2018. "The importance of population differences: Influence of individual characteristics on the Australian public’s preferences for emergency care," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 115-125.
  3. P. Marcin Sowa & Sam Kault & Joshua Byrnes & Shu-Kay Ng & Tracy Comans & Paul A. Scuffham, 2018. "Private Health Insurance Incentives in Australia: In Search of Cost-Effective Adjustments," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 31-41, February.
  4. Le Grande, M. & Ski, C.F. & Thompson, D.R. & Scuffham, P. & Kularatna, S. & Jackson, A.C. & Brown, A., 2017. "Social and emotional wellbeing assessment instruments for use with Indigenous Australians: A critical review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 164-173.
  5. L. B. Standfield & T. A. Comans & P. A. Scuffham, 2017. "An empirical comparison of Markov cohort modeling and discrete event simulation in a capacity-constrained health care setting," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(1), pages 33-47, January.
  6. L. Standfield & T. Comans & M. Raymer & S. O’Leary & N. Moretto & P. Scuffham, 2016. "The Efficiency of Increasing the Capacity of Physiotherapy Screening Clinics or Traditional Medical Services to Address Unmet Demand in Orthopaedic Outpatients: A Practical Application of Discrete Eve," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 479-491, August.
  7. Haitham Tuffaha & Shelley Roberts & Wendy Chaboyer & Louisa Gordon & Paul Scuffham, 2015. "Cost-Effectiveness and Value of Information Analysis of Nutritional Support for Preventing Pressure Ulcers in High-risk Patients: Implement Now, Research Later," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 167-179, April.
  8. Haitham Tuffaha & Claire Rickard & Joan Webster & Nicole Marsh & Louisa Gordon & Marianne Wallis & Paul Scuffham, 2014. "Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Clinically Indicated Versus Routine Replacement of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 51-58, February.
  9. N. Vecchio & G. Mihala & J. Sheridan & M. F. Hilton & H. Whiteford & P. A. Scuffham, 2014. "A link between labor participation, mental health and class of medication for mental well-being," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 376-385.
  10. Jennifer Whitty & Sharyn Rundle-Thiele & Paul Scuffham, 2012. "Insights from triangulation of two purchase choice elicitation methods to predict social decision making in healthcare," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 113-126, March.
  11. Jennifer Whitty & Paul Scuffham & Sharyn Rundle-Thielee, 2011. "Public and decision maker stated preferences for pharmaceutical subsidy decisions," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 73-79, March.
  12. Kent Sweeting & Jennifer Whitty & Paul Scuffham & Michael Yelland, 2011. "Patient Preferences for Treatment of Achilles Tendon Pain," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;International Academy of Health Preference Research, vol. 4(1), pages 45-54, January.
  13. Paul Scuffham & Jennifer Whitty & Matthew Taylor & Ruth Saxby, 2010. "Health system choice," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 89-97, March.
  14. Nerina Vecchio & Paul Scuffham, 2009. "Mental Health and Hours Worked Among Nurses," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 12(3), pages 299-320.
  15. P. A. Scuffham, 2003. "Economic factors and traffic crashes in New Zealand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 179-188.
  16. Oldenburg, B. & Scuffham, P., 2000. "Re McKinlay and Marceau's 'Tale of 3 Tails' [2]," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 90(2), pages 294-294.
  17. Scuffham, P. & Battistutta, D. & Segui-Gomez, M. & Levy, J. & Roman, H. & Thompson, K.M. & McCabe, K. & Graham, J.D., 2000. "Misperceptions of 'objective measurements'? [3] (multiple letters)," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 90(6), pages 988-989.
  18. Scuffham, P. & Devlin, N. & Eberhart-Phillips, J. & Wilson-Salt, R., 1999. "The cost-effectiveness of introducing a varicella vaccine to the New Zealand immunisation schedule," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 763-779, September.
  19. Martin Richardson & Joe Wallis & Tim Hazledine & Fred Gruen & Paul Scuffham & Martin Lally, 1997. "Book reviews," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 229-248.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Le Grande, M. & Ski, C.F. & Thompson, D.R. & Scuffham, P. & Kularatna, S. & Jackson, A.C. & Brown, A., 2017. "Social and emotional wellbeing assessment instruments for use with Indigenous Australians: A critical review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 164-173.

    Cited by:

    1. Evans, John Robert & Wilson, Rachel & Coleman, Clare & Man, Wing Young Nicola & Olds, Tim, 2018. "Physical activity among indigenous Australian children and youth in remote and non-remote areas," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 206(C), pages 93-99.

  2. L. B. Standfield & T. A. Comans & P. A. Scuffham, 2017. "An empirical comparison of Markov cohort modeling and discrete event simulation in a capacity-constrained health care setting," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(1), pages 33-47, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Syed Salleh & Praveen Thokala & Alan Brennan & Ruby Hughes & Simon Dixon, 2017. "Discrete Event Simulation-Based Resource Modelling in Health Technology Assessment," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 35(10), pages 989-1006, October.

  3. L. Standfield & T. Comans & M. Raymer & S. O’Leary & N. Moretto & P. Scuffham, 2016. "The Efficiency of Increasing the Capacity of Physiotherapy Screening Clinics or Traditional Medical Services to Address Unmet Demand in Orthopaedic Outpatients: A Practical Application of Discrete Eve," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 479-491, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Syed Salleh & Praveen Thokala & Alan Brennan & Ruby Hughes & Simon Dixon, 2017. "Discrete Event Simulation-Based Resource Modelling in Health Technology Assessment," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 35(10), pages 989-1006, October.

  4. N. Vecchio & G. Mihala & J. Sheridan & M. F. Hilton & H. Whiteford & P. A. Scuffham, 2014. "A link between labor participation, mental health and class of medication for mental well-being," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 376-385.

    Cited by:

    1. Ana María Iregui-Bohórquez & Ligia Alba Melo-Becerra & María Teresa Ramírez-Giraldo, 2014. "Health Status and Labor Force Participation: Evidence for Urban Low and Middle Income Individuals in Colombia," Borradores de Economia 851i, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    2. Halkos, George & Bousinakis, Dimitrios, 2017. "The effect of stress and dissatisfaction on employees during crisis," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 25-34.

  5. Jennifer Whitty & Paul Scuffham & Sharyn Rundle-Thielee, 2011. "Public and decision maker stated preferences for pharmaceutical subsidy decisions," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 73-79, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Whitty, Jennifer A. & Littlejohns, Peter, 2015. "Social values and health priority setting in Australia: An analysis applied to the context of health technology assessment," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 127-136.
    2. Gu, Yuanyuan & Lancsar, Emily & Ghijben, Peter & Butler, James RG & Donaldson, Cam, 2015. "Attributes and weights in health care priority setting: A systematic review of what counts and to what extent," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 41-52.

  6. P. A. Scuffham, 2003. "Economic factors and traffic crashes in New Zealand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 179-188.

    Cited by:

    1. Murali Adhikari & Krishna Paudel & Laxmi Paudel & James Bukenya, 2007. "Modelling swine supply response using a structural time series approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(7), pages 467-472.
    2. Yoshitsugu Kitazawa, 2010. "Size of economic activity and occurrence of fatal traffic accidents: a count panel data analysis on Fukuoka prefecture in Japan," Discussion Papers 41, Kyushu Sangyo University, Faculty of Economics.
    3. Kopits, Elizabeth & Cropper, Maureen, 2005. "Why have traffic fatalities declined in industrialized countries ? Implications for pedestrians and vehicle occupants," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3678, The World Bank.
    4. Shin-Jong Lin, 2009. "Economic fluctuations and health outcome: a panel analysis of Asia-Pacific countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 519-530.
    5. Rohan Best & Paul J. Burke, 2018. "Fuel prices and road accident outcomes in New Zealand," CAMA Working Papers 2018-57, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    6. Murali Adhikari & Krishna Paudel & Jack Houstan & James Bukenya, 2007. "Dairy supply response under stochastic trend and seasonality," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(12), pages 887-891.

  7. Scuffham, P. & Devlin, N. & Eberhart-Phillips, J. & Wilson-Salt, R., 1999. "The cost-effectiveness of introducing a varicella vaccine to the New Zealand immunisation schedule," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 763-779, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Jane Hall & Patricia Kenny & Madeleine King & Jordan Louviere & Rosalie Viney & Angela Yeoh, 2002. "Using stated preference discrete choice modelling to evaluate the introduction of varicella vaccination," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 457-465.
    2. Nancy Thiry & Philippe Beutels & Pierre Damme & Eddy Doorslaer, 2003. "Economic Evaluations of Varicella Vaccination Programmes," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 13-38, January.

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