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Cost-Effectiveness and Value of Information Analysis of Nutritional Support for Preventing Pressure Ulcers in High-risk Patients: Implement Now, Research Later

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  • Haitham Tuffaha
  • Shelley Roberts
  • Wendy Chaboyer
  • Louisa Gordon
  • Paul Scuffham

Abstract

Nutritional support is cost-effective in preventing pressure ulcers in high-risk hospitalised patients compared with standard diet. Future research to reduce decision uncertainty is worthwhile; however, given the opportunity losses associated with delaying the implementation, “implement and research” is the approach recommended for this intervention. Copyright Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

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  • Haitham Tuffaha & Shelley Roberts & Wendy Chaboyer & Louisa Gordon & Paul Scuffham, 2015. "Cost-Effectiveness and Value of Information Analysis of Nutritional Support for Preventing Pressure Ulcers in High-risk Patients: Implement Now, Research Later," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 167-179, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:aphecp:v:13:y:2015:i:2:p:167-179
    DOI: 10.1007/s40258-015-0152-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Aaron A. Stinnett & John Mullahy, 1998. "Net Health Benefits: A New Framework for the Analysis of Uncertainty in Cost-Effectiveness Analysis," NBER Technical Working Papers 0227, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Karl Claxton, 1999. "Bayesian approaches to the value of information: implications for the regulation of new pharmaceuticals," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 269-274, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Haitham Tuffaha, 2021. "Value of Information Analysis: Are We There Yet?," PharmacoEconomics - Open, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 139-141, June.

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