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Worker well-being before and during the COVID-19 restrictions: A longitudinal study in the UK

Author

Listed:
  • Diane Pelly

    (School of Economics, University College Dublin)

  • Michael Daly

    (Department of Psychology, Maynooth University)

  • Liam Delaney

    (Behavioural Science Unit, London School of Economics)

  • Orla Doyle

    (School of Economics, University College Dublin)

Abstract

The potential impact of COVID-19 restrictions on worker well-being is currently unknown. In this study we examine 15 well-being outcomes collected from 621 full-time workers assessed before (November, 2019 - February, 2020) and during (May-June, 2020) the COVID-19 pandemic. Fixed effects analyses are used to investigate how the COVID-19 restrictions and involuntary homeworking affect well-being and job performance. The majority of worker well-being measures are not adversely affected. Homeworkers feel more engaged and autonomous, experience fewer negative emotions and feel more connected to their organisations. However, these improvements come at the expense of reduced homelife satisfaction and job performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Diane Pelly & Michael Daly & Liam Delaney & Orla Doyle, 2021. "Worker well-being before and during the COVID-19 restrictions: A longitudinal study in the UK," Working Papers 202101, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:202101
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Guillaume Gueguen & Claudia Senik, 2022. "Adopting Telework. The causal impact of working from home on subjective wellbeing," Working Papers halshs-03455306, HAL.
    2. Gueguen, Guillaume & Senik, Claudia, 2022. "Adopting Telework. The causal impact of working from home on subjective well-being in 2020," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 2201, CEPREMAP.
    3. Guillaume Gueguen & Claudia Senik, 2022. "Adopting Telework. The causal impact of working from home on subjective wellbeing," PSE Working Papers halshs-03455306, HAL.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19 restrictions; workers; homeworking; subjective well-being; productivity; mental health; job satisfaction; engagement;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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