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Adam Cox

Personal Details

First Name:Adam
Middle Name:
Last Name:Cox
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco588
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Economics and Finance Group
Portsmouth Business School
University of Portsmouth

Portsmouth, United Kingdom
http://www.port.ac.uk/economics-and-finance/
RePEc:edi:depbsuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Adam Cox & Alan Leonard & Ansgar Wohlschlegel, 2019. "Quantifying the cost of foregone public goods spillovers on an island," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(8), pages 1170-1182, August.
  2. Cox, Adam & Craig, Russell & Tourish, Dennis, 2018. "Retraction statements and research malpractice in economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(5), pages 924-935.
  3. Adam Cox, 2018. "Spectator Demand, Uncertainty of Results, and Public Interest," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 19(1), pages 3-30, January.
  4. Cox, Adam & Collins, Alan & Woods, Lee & Ferguson, Neil, 2012. "A household level environmental Kuznets curve? Some recent evidence on transport emissions and income," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 187-189.
  5. Adam Cox, 2012. "Live Broadcasting, Gate Revenue, and Football Club Performance: Some Evidence," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 75-98, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Cox, Adam & Craig, Russell & Tourish, Dennis, 2018. "Retraction statements and research malpractice in economics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(5), pages 924-935.

    Cited by:

    1. Horton, Joanne & Krishna Kumar, Dhanya & Wood, Anthony, 2020. "Detecting academic fraud using Benford law: The case of Professor James Hunton," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(8).
    2. Mohan, Vijay, 2019. "On the use of blockchain-based mechanisms to tackle academic misconduct," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(9), pages 1-1.
    3. Tariq Ahmad Shah & Sumeer Gul & Saimah Bashir & Suhail Ahmad & Assumpció Huertas & Andrea Oliveira & Farzana Gulzar & Ashaq Hussain Najar & Kanu Chakraborty, 2021. "Influence of accessibility (open and toll-based) of scholarly publications on retractions," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 126(6), pages 4589-4606, June.
    4. Sandro Mendonça & João Pereira & Manuel Ennes Ferreira, 2018. "Gatekeeping African studies: what does “editormetrics” indicate about journal governance?," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 117(3), pages 1513-1534, December.
    5. Gehrig, Thomas & Stenbacka, Rune, 2017. "Journal Competition and the Quality of Published Research: Simultaneous versus Sequential Screening," CEPR Discussion Papers 12065, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Anna Abalkina & Alexander Libman, 2020. "The real costs of plagiarism: Russian governors, plagiarized PhD theses, and infrastructure in Russian regions," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 125(3), pages 2793-2820, December.

  2. Adam Cox, 2018. "Spectator Demand, Uncertainty of Results, and Public Interest," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 19(1), pages 3-30, January.

    Cited by:

    1. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Demand for Public Events in the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Case Study of European Football," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-09, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    2. Carl Singleton & J. James Reade & Johan Rewilak & Dominik Schreyer, 2021. "How big is home advantage at the Olympic Games?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2021-13, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    3. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Eliminating supportive crowds reduces referee bias," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-25, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    4. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Echoes: what happens when football is played behind closed doors?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-14, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    5. Dominik Schreyer & Sascha L. Schmidt & Benno Torgler, 2018. "Predicting season ticket holder loyalty using geographical information," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 272-277, February.
    6. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Stadium attendance demand during the COVID-19 crisis: Early empirical evidence from Belarus," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  3. Cox, Adam & Collins, Alan & Woods, Lee & Ferguson, Neil, 2012. "A household level environmental Kuznets curve? Some recent evidence on transport emissions and income," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 187-189.

    Cited by:

    1. Pablo-Romero, M.P. & Cruz, L. & Barata, E., 2017. "Testing the transport energy-environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis in the EU27 countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 257-269.
    2. Moises Neil V. Seriño, 2017. "Is Decoupling Possible? Association between Affluence and Household Carbon Emissions in the Philippines," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 165-185, June.
    3. Alexandre BERTHE & Luc ELIE, 2014. "Les conséquences environnementales des inégalités économiques : structuration théorique et perspectives de recherche (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2014-18, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).
    4. Ge, Xiaodong & Li, Yaoguang & Luloff, Albert E. & Dong, Kaikai & Xiao, Jun, 2015. "Effect of agricultural economic growth on sandy desertification in Horqin Sandy Land," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 53-63.
    5. Alexandre Berthe & Luc Elie, 2015. "Mechanisms explaining the impact of economic inequality on environmental deterioration," Post-Print halshs-02272919, HAL.
    6. David C Broadstock & Alan Collins & Lester C Hunt & Konstantinos Vergos, 2014. "Voluntary Disclosure, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Business Performance: Assessing the First Decade of Reporting," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 149, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    7. Pablo-Romero, María del P. & Sánchez-Braza, Antonio, 2017. "Residential energy environmental Kuznets curve in the EU-28," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 44-54.
    8. Cátia Sousa & Catarina Roseta‐Palma & Luís Filipe Martins, 2015. "Economic growth and transport: On the road to sustainability," Natural Resources Forum, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(1), pages 3-14, February.
    9. Caillavet, F. & Darmon, N. & Fadhuile, A. & Nichele, V., 2015. "Who emits most? The environmental impact of food purchases of French households," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211382, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

  4. Adam Cox, 2012. "Live Broadcasting, Gate Revenue, and Football Club Performance: Some Evidence," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 75-98, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Babatunde Buraimo & Rob Simmons, 2015. "Uncertainty of Outcome or Star Quality? Television Audience Demand for English Premier League Football," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 449-469, November.
    2. Christian Gjersing Nielsen & Rasmus K. Storm & Tor Georg Jakobsen, 2019. "The impact of English Premier League broadcasts on Danish spectator demand: a small league perspective," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 89(6), pages 633-653, August.
    3. Garcia del Barrio, Pedro & Pujol, Francesc, 2016. "Broadcasting revenues and media value in European football," Economics Discussion Papers 2016-36, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Stefan Szymanski, 2017. "Entry into exit: insolvency in English professional football," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 64(4), pages 419-444, September.
    5. Paul Downward, 2014. "English professional football," Chapters, in: John Goddard & Peter Sloane (ed.), Handbook on the Economics of Professional Football, chapter 17, pages 277-297, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Iuliia Naidenova & Petr Parshakov & Sofiia Paklina, 2020. "Determinants of Football Fans’ Happiness: Evidence from Facial Emotion Recognition," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 1103-1116, March.

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