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Who emits most? The environmental impact of food purchases of French households

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Listed:
  • Caillavet, F.
  • Darmon, N.
  • Fadhuile, A.
  • Nichele, V.

Abstract

The environmental impact of food is a major concern for climate change. This paper estimates the CO2 emissions due to food purchases of French households and analyses the disparities between income classes. To combine environment with health concerns, we consider as well the caloric content of foods and normalize CO2 emissions on a daily 2000kcalories basis. Data on French food purchases come from Kantar 1998-2010. Using Life-Cycle-Analysis from Greenext, we obtain CO2equivalent emissions for different food groups. Then we adjust levels of emissions by linear regression on income and age. We find that CO2 emissions of food purchases amount to 3.9kg/day/household. Lowest-income households emit more CO2 compared to richest households (+14.7%), but less on an adjusted 2000kcal basis (-9.6%). In a public policy perspective, richer households should be the first target of diet change since their consumption favours higher CO2 emitting food groups than lower-income households, at caloric level constant.

Suggested Citation

  • Caillavet, F. & Darmon, N. & Fadhuile, A. & Nichele, V., 2015. "Who emits most? The environmental impact of food purchases of French households," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211382, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:211382
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/211382
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Emmanuel Combet & Frédéric Ghersi & Jean-Charles Hourcade & Camille Thubin, 2010. "La fiscalité carbone au risque des enjeux d'équité," Revue française d'économie, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(2), pages 59-91.
    2. Gene M. Grossman & Alan B. Krueger, 1995. "Economic Growth and the Environment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 353-377.
    3. Timothy K.M. Beatty, 2010. "Do the Poor Pay More for Food?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(3), pages 608-621.
    4. Olivier Allais & Patrice Bertail & Véronique Nichèle, 2010. "The Effects of a Fat Tax on French Households' Purchases: A Nutritional Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(1), pages 228-245.
    5. Hannes Egli, 2004. "The environmental Kuznets curve : evidence from time series data for Germany," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 03/28, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    6. Hoolohan, C. & Berners-Lee, M. & McKinstry-West, J. & Hewitt, C.N., 2013. "Mitigating the greenhouse gas emissions embodied in food through realistic consumer choices," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1065-1074.
    7. Galeotti, Marzio & Lanza, Alessandro & Pauli, Francesco, 2006. "Reassessing the environmental Kuznets curve for CO2 emissions: A robustness exercise," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 152-163, April.
    8. Giovanis, Eleftherios, 2013. "Environmental Kuznets curve: Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 602-611.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    CO2 emissions; Food purchases; Income disparities.; Consumer/Household Economics; Environmental Economics and Policy; Q56; Q18; Q58;

    JEL classification:

    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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