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Journal Competition and the Quality of Published Research: Simultaneous versus Sequential Screening

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  • Gehrig, Thomas
  • Stenbacka, Rune

Abstract

We explore how the nature of the screening technology and the organization of the submission system affect the screening incentives of competing journals. Total screening in a duopolistic journal industry exceeds that of a monopoly. Exclusivity requirements for submissions induce more screening than systems with parallel submission. Interestingly, in the sequential screening model established journal rankings tend to reduce screening incentives. The screening technology determines whether the high-ranked or low-ranked journal have stronger screening incentives, which has implications for the long-run stability of established rankings.

Suggested Citation

  • Gehrig, Thomas & Stenbacka, Rune, 2017. "Journal Competition and the Quality of Published Research: Simultaneous versus Sequential Screening," CEPR Discussion Papers 12065, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12065
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Emmanuel Farhi & Josh Lerner & Jean Tirole, 2013. "Fear of rejection? Tiered certification and transparency," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 44(4), pages 610-631, December.
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    12. Gehrig, Thomas & Stenbacka, Rune, 2011. "Decentralized screening: Coordination failure, multiple equilibria and cycles," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 60-69, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    assessment of research quality; competition between journals; Information Acquisition; simultaneous versus sequential screening;

    JEL classification:

    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets

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