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Loan Sales and Screening Incentives

  • Bester, Helmut
  • Gehrig, Thomas
  • Stenbacka, Rune

We analyze the effect of loan sales on the intensity of costly screening. Loan sales strengthen screening incentives when screening primarily improves the bank’s ability to identify profitable loans and when banks retain most of those profitable loans. However, loan sales dampen screening incentives when the benefit of screening primarily helps to weed out unprofitable projects. Moreover, alternative institutions of information production and the institutional market framework affect the relative benefits and costs of loan sales, and screening respectively. Accordingly, the potential regulation of loan sales has to take into account the whole impact on societal information production, both in markets and non-market institutions.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 9084.

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Date of creation: Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9084
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  1. Gary Gorton & George Pennacchi, 1990. "Banks and Loan Sales: Marketing Non-Marketable Assets," NBER Working Papers 3551, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Gehrig, Thomas, 1998. "Screening, Cross-Border Banking and the Allocation of Credit," CEPR Discussion Papers 1973, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Raaj Kumar Sah & Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1984. "The Architecture of Economic Systems: Hierarchies and Polyarchies," NBER Working Papers 1334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Fender, Ingo & Mitchell, Janet, 2009. "Incentives and Tranche Retention in Securitisation: A Screening Model," CEPR Discussion Papers 7483, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Gehrig, Thomas & Stenbacka, Rune, 2007. "Information sharing and lending market competition with switching costs and poaching," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 77-99, January.
  6. Giovanni Dell’Ariccia & Deniz Igan & Luc Laeven, 2012. "Credit Booms and Lending Standards: Evidence from the Subprime Mortgage Market," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44, pages 367-384, 03.
  7. Gehrig, Thomas & Stenbacka, Rune, 2011. "Decentralized screening: Coordination failure, multiple equilibria and cycles," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 60-69, June.
  8. Gabriella Chiesa, 2008. "Optimal Credit Risk Transfer, Monitored Finance, and Banks," EIEF Working Papers Series 0811, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised Sep 2008.
  9. Douglas W. Diamond, 1984. "Financial Intermediation and Delegated Monitoring," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(3), pages 393-414.
  10. Benjamin J. Keys & Tanmoy Mukherjee & Amit Seru & Vikrant Vig, 2010. "Did Securitization Lead to Lax Screening? Evidence from Subprime Loans," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 307-362.
  11. Berndt, Antje & Gupta, Anurag, 2009. "Moral hazard and adverse selection in the originate-to-distribute model of bank credit," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(5), pages 725-743, July.
  12. John Kiff & Michael Kisser, 2010. "Asset Securitization and Optimal Retention," IMF Working Papers 10/74, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Jappelli, Tullio & Pagano, Marco, 2002. "Information sharing, lending and defaults: Cross-country evidence," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(10), pages 2017-2045, October.
  14. Christine A. Parlour & Guillaume Plantin, 2008. "Loan Sales and Relationship Banking," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(3), pages 1291-1314, 06.
  15. Thomas Gehrig & Pierre Regibeau & Kate Rockett, 2000. "original papers : Project evaluation and organizational form," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 5(2), pages 177-199.
  16. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2009. "The Consequences of Mortgage Credit Expansion: Evidence from the U.S. Mortgage Default Crisis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1449-1496.
  17. Broecker, Thorsten, 1990. "Credit-Worthiness Tests and Interbank Competition," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(2), pages 429-52, March.
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