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Opening Access to Research

Author

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  • Armstrong, Mark

Abstract

Traditionally, the scholarly journal market operates so that research institutions are charged high prices and the wider public is often excluded altogether, while authors can usually publish for free and commercial publishers enjoy high profits. Two forms of open access regulation can mitigate these problems: (i) authors are required to publish in a journal which allows readers free and immediate access to their article, or (ii) authors are required to make freely available an inferior substitute to the published paper (and to publish in a journal which permits this). The former policy is likely to result in authors paying to publish, which may lead to a reduction in the quantity of published papers and may make authors less willing to publish in selective journals. The latter policy makes freely available only an inferior version of the published article, but may be consistent with authors publishing for free.

Suggested Citation

  • Armstrong, Mark, 2014. "Opening Access to Research," MPRA Paper 59731, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:59731
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/59731/1/MPRA_paper_59731.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Theodore C. Bergstrom, 2001. "Free Labour for Costly Journals?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 183-198, Fall.
    2. Doh-Shin Jeon & Domenico Menicucci, 2006. "Bundling Electronic Journals and Competition among Publishers," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(5), pages 1038-1083, September.
    3. Jean‐Charles Rochet & Jean Tirole, 2006. "Two‐sided markets: a progress report," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 37(3), pages 645-667, September.
    4. Gomes, Renato & Pavan, Alessandro, 2016. "Many-to-many matching and price discrimination," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(3), September.
    5. Doh-Shin Jeon & Jean-Charles Rochet, 2010. "The Pricing of Academic Journals: A Two-Sided Market Perspective," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 222-255, May.
    6. Peitz, Martin & Waelbroeck, Patrick, 2006. "Piracy of digital products: A critical review of the theoretical literature," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 449-476, November.
    7. Glenn Ellison, 2002. "The Slowdown of the Economics Publishing Process," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(5), pages 947-993, October.
    8. repec:cdl:ucsbec:16-01 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Berg, Sanford V, 1971. "Increasing the Efficiency of the Economics Journal Market," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 798-813, September.
    10. Mark J. McCabe & Christopher M. Snyder, 2005. "Open Access and Academic Journal Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 453-459, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Doh-Shin Jeon & Domenico Menicucci, 2017. "The Benefits of Diverse Preferences in Library Consortia," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(1), pages 105-135, March.
    2. Jeon, Doh-Shin & Menicucci, Domenico, 2013. "When Is Building a Library Consortium Bene ficial?," IDEI Working Papers 791, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse, revised 07 Apr 2014.
    3. repec:taf:promet:v:35:y:2017:i:1:p:75-92 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    publishing; journals; open access; two-sided markets; regulation;

    JEL classification:

    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • L5 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

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