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How Many More Cites Is A $3,000 Open Access Fee Buying You? Empirical Evidence From A Natural Experiment

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  • Frank Mueller‐Langer
  • Richard Watt

Abstract

We analyze the effect of open access (OA) status of journal articles on citations. Using cross‐sectional and panel data from mathematics and economics, we perform negative binomial, Poisson, and generalized method of moments/instrumental variable methods regressions. We benefit from a natural experiment via hybrid OA pilot agreements. Citations to pre‐prints allow us to identify the intrinsic quality of articles prior to journal publication. Overall, our analysis suggests that there is no hybrid OA citation benefit. However, for the subpopulation of articles without OA pre‐ or post‐prints, we find positive hybrid OA effects for the full sample and each discipline separately. (JEL L17, O33, A11)

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Mueller‐Langer & Richard Watt, 2018. "How Many More Cites Is A $3,000 Open Access Fee Buying You? Empirical Evidence From A Natural Experiment," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(2), pages 931-954, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:56:y:2018:i:2:p:931-954
    DOI: 10.1111/ecin.12545
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Frank Mueller-Langer & Marc Scheufen & Patrick Waelbroeck, 2018. "Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries? Empirical Evidence from Article-Level Data," JRC Working Papers on Digital Economy 2018-05, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Mueller-Langer, Frank & Scheufen, Marc & Waelbroeck, Patrick, 2020. "Does online access promote research in developing countries? Empirical evidence from article-level data," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(2).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L17 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Open Source Products and Markets
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists

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