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Peter T. Calcagno

Personal Details

First Name:Peter
Middle Name:T.
Last Name:Calcagno
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pca369
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree: School of Business; College of Charleston (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
School of Business
College of Charleston

Charleston, South Carolina (United States)
https://sb.cofc.edu/academics/academicdepartments/economics/
RePEc:edi:decofus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Calcagno, Peter & Hefner, Frank, 2018. "Targeted Economic Incentives: An Analysis of State Fiscal Policy and Regulatory Conditions," Working Papers 07536, George Mason University, Mercatus Center.
  2. Calcagno, Peter & Lopez, Edward, 2015. "The Evolution of Federal Budget Rules and the Effects on Fiscal Policy: How Informal Norms Have Trumped Formal Constraints," Working Papers 06838, George Mason University, Mercatus Center.
  3. Peter Calcagno & Monica Escaleras, 2007. "Does Stringency of Gubernatorial Term Limits Matter?," Working Papers 2, Department of Economics and Finance, College of Charleston, revised Sep 2007.
  4. Peter Calcagno & Monica Escaleras, 2006. "Party Alternation, Divided Government, and Fiscal Performance within U.S. States," Working Papers 06006, Department of Economics, College of Business, Florida Atlantic University, revised Dec 2006.
  5. Peter T. Calcagno & John D. Jackson, "undated". "PAC Spending and Roll Call Voting in the U.S. House: An Empirical Extension," Working Papers 4, Department of Economics and Finance, College of Charleston.
  6. Peter Calcagno & Christopher Westley, "undated". "An Institutional Analysis of Voter Turnout: The Role of Primary Type and the Expressive and Instrumental Voting Hypotheses," Working Papers 1, Department of Economics and Finance, College of Charleston.

Articles

  1. Peter T. Calcagno & Meg M. Montgomery, 2021. "The gender wage gap: an analysis of US congressional staff members," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 188(1), pages 183-201, July.
  2. Peter T. Calcagno & Beatriz Maldonado, 2020. "Divided government in Latin America," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(12), pages 1010-1015, June.
  3. Peter Calcagno & Joshua C. Hall, 2020. "Formal and informal constraints on state government and economic freedom," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(1), pages 801-806.
  4. Calvin Blackwell & Peter T. Calcagno, 2019. "Party-crashers or wallflowers? The lack of strategic voting in experimental primaries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(19), pages 1641-1648, November.
  5. David Ahnen & Peter T, Calcagno, 2019. "Constitutions and Social Trust: An Analysis of the US States," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 34(Fall 2019), pages 11-33.
  6. Russell S. Sobel & Reagan N. Sobel & Douglas M. Walker & Peter T. Calcagno, 2019. "How Effective Are Expert Tv Hosts At Saving Failing Businesses?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(1), pages 9-24, January.
  7. Monica Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno, 2018. "Does Fiscal Decentralization Affect Infrastructure Quality? An Examination Of U.S. States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(2), pages 410-422, April.
  8. Peter Calcagno & Frank Hefner, 2018. "Targeted Economic Incentives: An Analysis of State Fiscal Policy and Regulatory Conditions," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 48(1), pages 71-91, Spring.
  9. Calcagno, Peter T. & Lã“Pez, Edward J., 2017. "Informal norms trump formal constraints: the evolution of fiscal policy institutions in the United States," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(1), pages 211-242, March.
  10. Peter T. Calcagno & Douglas M. Walker, 2016. "A Review Of Regulatory Theory And The U.S. Casino Industry," Journal of Gambling Business and Economics, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 10(1), pages 14-39.
  11. Peter Calcagno, 2014. "Wilfred Dolfsma: Government failure: society, markets, and rules," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(1), pages 275-277, July.
  12. Peter Calcagno & Russell Sobel, 2014. "Regulatory costs on entrepreneurship and establishment employment size," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 541-559, March.
  13. Douglas M. Walker & Peter T. Calcagno, 2013. "Casinos and political corruption in the United States: a Granger causality analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(34), pages 4781-4795, December.
  14. Peter T. Calcagno & Justin D. Benefield, 2013. "Economic freedom, the cost of public borrowing, and state bond ratings," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 5(1), pages 72-85, April.
  15. Peter Calcagno & Edward Lopez, 2012. "Divided we vote," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 151(3), pages 517-536, June.
  16. Monica Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno & William F. Shughart II, 2012. "Corruption and Voter Participation," Public Finance Review, , vol. 40(6), pages 789-815, November.
  17. Peter Calcagno & Whitney Whitson, 2011. "Of Golf, Capitalism, and Socialism: An Empirical Analysis," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(2), pages 199-200, June.
  18. Peter Calcagno & Douglas Walker & John Jackson, 2010. "Determinants of the probability and timing of commercial casino legalization in the United States," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(1), pages 69-90, January.
  19. Calcagno, Peter T. & Hall, Joshua C. & Lawson, Robert A., 2010. "Objectivism versus subjectivism: A market test," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 445-448, November.
  20. Monica P. Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno, 2009. "Does the Gubernatorial Term Limit Type Affect State Government Expenditures?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 37(5), pages 572-595, September.
  21. Peter Calcagno & Christopher Westley, 2008. "An institutional analysis of voter turnout: the role of primary type and the expressive and instrumental voting hypotheses," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 94-110, June.
  22. Peter Calcagno & John Jackson, 2008. "PAC Spending and Roll Call Voting in the U.S. House: An Empirical Extension," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(25), pages 1-11.
  23. A. Adams III & Budina Naydenova & Peter Calcagno, 2008. "Patent Infringement and Royalty Rates: Is Litigation a ‘Deterrent’?," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(4), pages 499-500, December.
  24. Calcagno, Peter T. & Hefner, Frank L., 2007. "State Targeting of Business Investment: Does Targeting Increase Corporate Tax Revenue?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 37(2), pages 1-13.
  25. Peter Calcagno & Monica Escaleras, 2007. "Party alternation, divided government, and fiscal performance within US States," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 111-128, February.
  26. Christopher Westley & Peter T. Calcagno & Richard Ault, 2004. "Primary Election Systems and Candidate Deviation," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 365-376, Summer.
  27. Peter T. Calcagno & Henry Thompson, 2004. "State Economic Incentives: Stimulus or Reallocation?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 32(6), pages 651-665, November.
  28. A. Adams & Peter Calcagno, 2002. "Characteristics of those offended by organ procurement alternatives," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 30(2), pages 222-222, June.
  29. Calcagno, Peter T & Jackson, John D, 1998. "Political Action Committee Spending and Senate Roll Call Voting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 97(4), pages 569-585, December.
    RePEc:eme:jfeppp:17576381311317790 is not listed on IDEAS

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Calcagno, Peter & Hefner, Frank, 2018. "Targeted Economic Incentives: An Analysis of State Fiscal Policy and Regulatory Conditions," Working Papers 07536, George Mason University, Mercatus Center.

    Cited by:

    1. Mitchell, Matt & Farren, Michael & Gonzalez, Olivia & Horpedahl, Jeremy, 2019. "The Economics of a Targeted Economic Development Subsidy," Annals of Computational Economics, George Mason University, Mercatus Center, November.
    2. Dmitry B. Rokhlin & Gennady A. Ougolnitsky, 2024. "A Simple Model for Targeting Industrial Investments with Subsidies and Taxes," Mathematics, MDPI, vol. 12(6), pages 1-18, March.
    3. Russell S. Sobel & Gary A. Wagner & Peter T. Calcagno, 2024. "The political economy of state economic development incentives: A case of rent extraction," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(1), pages 104-151, March.
    4. Chris Mothorpe & W. William Woolsey & Russell S. Sobel, 2021. "Do political motivations and strategic considerations influence municipal annexation patterns?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 188(3), pages 385-405, September.
    5. Jia Wang & Weici Yuan & Cynthia Rogers, 2020. "Economic Development Incentives: What Can We Learn From Policy Regime Changes?," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 34(2), pages 116-125, May.

  2. Peter Calcagno & Monica Escaleras, 2006. "Party Alternation, Divided Government, and Fiscal Performance within U.S. States," Working Papers 06006, Department of Economics, College of Business, Florida Atlantic University, revised Dec 2006.

    Cited by:

    1. Fabiana Rocha & Veronica Orellano, Karina Bugarin, 2016. "Local public finances in Brazil: are mayoral characteristics important?," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2016_04, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    2. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.
    3. Niklas Potrafke, 2011. "Does government ideology influence budget composition? Empirical evidence from OECD countries," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 101-134, June.
    4. Peter Calcagno & Frank Hefner, 2018. "Targeted Economic Incentives: An Analysis of State Fiscal Policy and Regulatory Conditions," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 48(1), pages 71-91, Spring.
    5. Potrafke, Niklas, 2010. "The growth of public health expenditures in OECD countries: Do government ideology and electoral motives matter?," Munich Reprints in Economics 19280, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    6. Monica Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno, 2018. "Does Fiscal Decentralization Affect Infrastructure Quality? An Examination Of U.S. States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(2), pages 410-422, April.
    7. Niklas Potrafke, 2010. "Ideology and cultural policy," TWI Research Paper Series 49, Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universität Konstanz.
    8. Potrafke, Niklas, 2009. "Political cycles and economic performance in OECD countries: empirical evidence from 1951-2006," MPRA Paper 23751, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Heiko T. Burret & Lars P. Feld, 2014. "A Note on Budget Rules and Fiscal Federalism," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(01), pages 03-11, April.
    10. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2012. "Political Ideology and Economic Freedom Across Canadian Provinces," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 38(2), pages 143-166.
    11. Veronica Ines Fernandez Orellano & Fabiana Rocha & Karina Bugarin, 2018. "Local Public Finances In Brazil: Are Mayoral Characteristics Important?," Anais do XLIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 44th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 70, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    12. David T. Mitchell & Danny R. Hughes & Noel D. Campbell, 2014. "Are Powerful Majorities Inefficient for Parties and Efficient for Taxpayers?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 42(1), pages 117-138, January.
    13. Peter Calcagno & Alexander Marsella & Yang Zhou, 2024. "Income inequality and party alternation: State‐level evidence from the United States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(2), pages 355-374, April.
    14. Niklas Potrafke, 2017. "Government Ideology and Economic Policy-Making in the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 6444, CESifo.
    15. Hyungon Kim & Chang Kwon, 2015. "The Effects of Fiscal Consolidation and Welfare Composition of Spending on Electoral Outcomes: Evidence from US Gubernatorial Elections between 1978 and 2006," New Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 228-253, April.
    16. Monica P. Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno, 2009. "Does the Gubernatorial Term Limit Type Affect State Government Expenditures?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 37(5), pages 572-595, September.

  3. Peter Calcagno & Christopher Westley, "undated". "An Institutional Analysis of Voter Turnout: The Role of Primary Type and the Expressive and Instrumental Voting Hypotheses," Working Papers 1, Department of Economics and Finance, College of Charleston.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Drinkwater & Colin Jennings, 2017. "Expressive voting and two-dimensional political competition: an application to law and order policy by New Labour in the UK," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 79-96, March.
    2. David Mitchell, 2023. "Covid-19 and the 2020 presidential election," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 188-209, June.
    3. Andreu ARENAS, 2016. "Sticky Votes," LIDAM Reprints CORE 2763, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    4. Daniel D. Bonneau & John Zaleski, 2021. "The effect of California’s top-two primary system on voter turnout in US House Elections," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 1-21, March.
    5. Hamlin, Alan & Jennings, Colin, 2009. "Expressive Political Behaviour: Foundations, Scope and Implications," SIRE Discussion Papers 2009-41, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    6. Jennings, Colin & Drinkwater, Stephen, 2012. "An Analysis of the Electoral Use of Policy on Law and Order by New Labour," SIRE Discussion Papers 2012-77, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    7. Monica Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno & William F. Shughart II, 2012. "Corruption and Voter Participation," Public Finance Review, , vol. 40(6), pages 789-815, November.

Articles

  1. Calvin Blackwell & Peter T. Calcagno, 2019. "Party-crashers or wallflowers? The lack of strategic voting in experimental primaries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(19), pages 1641-1648, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Bose, Paul, 2021. "Political (self-)selection and competition: Evidence from U.S. Congressional elections," VfS Annual Conference 2021 (Virtual Conference): Climate Economics 242377, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  2. Monica Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno, 2018. "Does Fiscal Decentralization Affect Infrastructure Quality? An Examination Of U.S. States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(2), pages 410-422, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Chris Mothorpe & W. William Woolsey & Russell S. Sobel, 2021. "Do political motivations and strategic considerations influence municipal annexation patterns?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 188(3), pages 385-405, September.

  3. Peter Calcagno & Frank Hefner, 2018. "Targeted Economic Incentives: An Analysis of State Fiscal Policy and Regulatory Conditions," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 48(1), pages 71-91, Spring.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Calcagno, Peter T. & Lã“Pez, Edward J., 2017. "Informal norms trump formal constraints: the evolution of fiscal policy institutions in the United States," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(1), pages 211-242, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Ringa Raudla & James W. Douglas & Muiris MacCarthaigh, 2022. "Medium‐term expenditure frameworks: Credible instrument or mirage?," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(3), pages 71-92, September.
    2. Batinti, Alberto & Andriani, Luca & Filippetti, Andrea, 2019. "Local government fiscal policy, social capital and electoral payoff: evidence across Italian municipalities," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100438, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Peter Calcagno & Joshua C. Hall, 2020. "Formal and informal constraints on state government and economic freedom," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(1), pages 801-806.
    4. Marvin Phaup, 2022. "Federal budget process reform: An economics perspective, with imperfect, “Human” decision‐makers," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(3), pages 114-130, September.

  5. Peter T. Calcagno & Douglas M. Walker, 2016. "A Review Of Regulatory Theory And The U.S. Casino Industry," Journal of Gambling Business and Economics, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 10(1), pages 14-39.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas A. Garrett & David Paton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2020. "Taxing Gambling Machines To Enhance Public and Private Revenue," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(4), pages 500-523, November.

  6. Peter Calcagno & Russell Sobel, 2014. "Regulatory costs on entrepreneurship and establishment employment size," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 541-559, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Trey Malone & Antonios M. Koumpias & Per L. Bylund, 2019. "Entrepreneurial response to interstate regulatory competition: evidence from a behavioral discrete choice experiment," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 172-192, April.
    2. David Urbano & Sebastian Aparicio & David Audretsch, 2019. "Twenty-five years of research on institutions, entrepreneurship, and economic growth: what has been learned?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 21-49, June.
    3. Claudia Alvarez & José Ernesto Amorós & David Urbano, 2014. "Regulations and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Developed and Developing Countries," Past Working Papers 02, Universidad del Desarrollo, School of Business and Economics, revised Nov 2014.
    4. James B. Bailey & Diana W. Thomas, 2017. "Regulating away competition: the effect of regulation on entrepreneurship and employment," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 237-254, December.
    5. Lucas, David & Boudreaux, Christopher, 2018. "Federal Regulation, Job Creation, and the Moderating Effect of State Economic Freedom," MPRA Paper 92593, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. David S. Lucas & Christopher J. Boudreaux, 2019. "The Interdependence of Hierarchical Institutions: Federal Regulation, Job Creation, and the Moderating Effect of State Economic Freedom," Papers 1903.02924, arXiv.org.
    7. Andrea M. Herrmann, 2019. "A plea for varieties of entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 331-343, February.
    8. Dilli, Selin & Elert, Niklas & Herrmann, Andrea M., 2018. "Varieties of Entrepreneurship: Exploring the Institutional Foundations of Different Entrepreneurship Types through ‘Varieties-of-Capitalism’ Arguments," Working Paper Series 1202, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    9. Lucas, David S. & Boudreaux, Christopher J., 2020. "National regulation, state-level policy, and local job creation in the United States: A multilevel perspective," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(4).
    10. Diana W. Thomas, 2018. "A process perspective on regulation: Who bears the dispersed costs of regulation?," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 31(4), pages 395-402, December.

  7. Douglas M. Walker & Peter T. Calcagno, 2013. "Casinos and political corruption in the United States: a Granger causality analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(34), pages 4781-4795, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Zachary D. Blizard, 2023. "The Interaction Effect of Economic Freedom and Economic Development on Corruption in US States," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 38(Summer 20), pages 17-37.
    2. Michael Greiner & Jing Sun, 2021. "How corporate social responsibility can incentivize top managers: A commitment to sustainability as an agency intervention," Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 28(4), pages 1360-1375, July.
    3. Ralph Kober & Deryl Northcott, 2021. "Testing cause‐and‐effect relationships within a balanced scorecard," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 61(S1), pages 1815-1849, April.

  8. Peter T. Calcagno & Justin D. Benefield, 2013. "Economic freedom, the cost of public borrowing, and state bond ratings," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 5(1), pages 72-85, April.

    Cited by:

    1. John A. Dove, 2017. "Judicial Independence and US State Bond Ratings: An Empirical Investigation," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 24-46, September.
    2. John A. Dove & Courtney A. Collins & Daniel J. Smith, 2018. "The impact of public pension board of trustee composition on state bond ratings," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 51-73, February.
    3. Claudio Detotto & Bryan C. McCannon, 2017. "Economic freedom and public, non-market institutions: evidence from criminal prosecution," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 107-128, May.
    4. Çağatay KARAKÖY & Alptekin ULUTAŞ & Darjan KARABASEVIC & Salim ÜRE & Ali Oğuz BAYRAKÇIL, 2023. "The Evaluation of Economic Freedom Indexes of EU Countries with a GREY Hybrid MCDM Model," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(1), pages 129-144, March.
    5. Bryan C. McCannon & Joshua C. Hall, 2021. "Stay‐at‐home orders were issued earlier in economically unfree states," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 87(4), pages 1138-1151, April.

  9. Peter Calcagno & Edward Lopez, 2012. "Divided we vote," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 151(3), pages 517-536, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.
    2. Francesco De Sinopoli & Leo Ferraris & Giovanna Iannantuoni, 2011. "Moderating Government," Working Papers 211, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2011.
    3. Joshua C. Hall & Dean Stansel & Danko Tarabar, 2015. "Economic Freedom Studies at the State Level: A Survey," Working Papers 15-07, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    4. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The size and scope of government in the US states: Does party ideology matter?," ifo Working Paper Series 162, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    5. Peter Calcagno & Joshua C. Hall, 2020. "Formal and informal constraints on state government and economic freedom," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(1), pages 801-806.
    6. Ted Hayduk, 2022. "Association membership, election cycles, and political donation patterns," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 359-384, December.
    7. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2012. "Political Ideology and Economic Freedom Across Canadian Provinces," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 38(2), pages 143-166.
    8. J. Brandon Bolen & Russell S. Sobel, 2020. "Does Balance Among Areas of Institutional Quality Matter for Economic Growth?," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 86(4), pages 1418-1445, April.
    9. Niklas Potrafke, 2017. "Government Ideology and Economic Policy-Making in the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 6444, CESifo.

  10. Monica Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno & William F. Shughart II, 2012. "Corruption and Voter Participation," Public Finance Review, , vol. 40(6), pages 789-815, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke, 2014. "Just hire your spouse! Evidence from a political scandal in Bavaria," ifo Working Paper Series 194, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    2. Lacombe, Donald J. & Coats, R. Morris & Shughart II, William F. & Karahan, Gökhan, 2016. "Corruption and Voter Turnout: A Spatial Econometric Approach," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 46(2), December.
    3. Andersen, Jørgen Juel & Heggedal, Tom-Reiel, 2019. "Political rents and voter information in search equilibrium," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 146-168.
    4. Niklas Potrafke & Felix Rösel, 2018. "A banana republic? The effects of inconsistencies in the counting of votes on voting behavior," ifo Working Paper Series 276, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    5. Elena Costas-Pérez, 2014. "Political corruption and voter turnout: mobilization or disaffection?," Working Papers 2014/27, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    6. Nadia Fiorino & Nicola Pontarollo & Roberto Ricciuti, 2017. "Supra National, National and Regional Dimensions of Voter Turnout in European Parliament Elections," JRC Research Reports JRC108755, Joint Research Centre.
    7. Paulo Arvate & Sergio Mittlaender, 2017. "Condemning corruption while condoning inefficiency: an experimental investigation into voting behavior," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 172(3), pages 399-419, September.
    8. Albert Solé-Ollé & Pilar Sorribas-Navarro, 2014. "Does corruption erode trust in government? Evidence from a recent surge of local scandals in Spain," Working Papers 2014/26, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

  11. Peter Calcagno & Douglas Walker & John Jackson, 2010. "Determinants of the probability and timing of commercial casino legalization in the United States," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(1), pages 69-90, January.

    Cited by:

    1. María Teresa Álvarez-Martínez & Michael L. Lahr, 2016. "Gaming, States, and Tax Revenues—the Tortoise or the Hare: A CGE Comparative Assessment of Casino Resorts and Games-Only Casinos," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 236-258, June.
    2. Karl Geisler & Mark Nichols, 2016. "Riverboat casino gambling impacts on employment and income in host and surrounding counties," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 101-123, January.
    3. Philander, Kahlil S. & Bernhard, Bo J. & Wimmer, Bradley S. & Singh, Ashok K. & Eadington, William R., 2015. "U.S. casino revenue taxes and short-run labor outcomes," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 35-46.
    4. Lorin DRAGAN & Dana HIRGAU, 2021. "What do international tourists seek for when playing in the casinos? A Bucharest gambling market study," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 13(3), pages 291-305, November.
    5. Kent Grote & Victor Matheson, 2011. "The Economics of Lotteries: A Survey of the Literature," Working Papers 1109, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    6. Francis Markham & Bruce Doran & Martin Young, 2014. "The Spatial Extents of Casino Catchments in Australia," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 60-78, March.
    7. Michael Lahr & Maria Alvarez, 2013. "Tortoise and the Hare Revisited? A CGE Analysis of Gaming and State Tax Revenues:," ERSA conference papers ersa13p191, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Mark W. Nichols & Mehmet Serkan Tosun & Jingjing Yang, 2015. "The Fiscal Impact of Legalized Casino Gambling," Public Finance Review, , vol. 43(6), pages 739-761, November.
    9. Douglas M. Walker, 2010. "Casinos and Crime in the USA," Chapters, in: Bruce L. Benson & Paul R. Zimmerman (ed.), Handbook on the Economics of Crime, chapter 19, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Justus Haucap & Radivoje Nedic & Talha Şimşek, 2023. "Regulatory objectives vs fiscal interests: Are German casino locations motivated by beggar-thy-neighbor policy? An empirical analysis," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 291-311, April.
    11. Douglas M. Walker & Todd M. Nesbit, 2014. "Casino Revenue Sensitivity to Competing Casinos: A Spatial Analysis of Missouri," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 21-40, March.
    12. Will E. Cummings & Douglas M. Walker & Chad D. Cotti, 2017. "The Effect Of Casino Proximity On Lottery Sales: Evidence From Maryland," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(4), pages 684-699, October.
    13. Douglas M. Walker & Peter T. Calcagno, 2013. "Casinos and political corruption in the United States: a Granger causality analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(34), pages 4781-4795, December.
    14. Siew Hoon Lim & Lei Zhang, 2017. "Does Casino Development Have a Positive Effect on Economic Growth?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 409-434, September.
    15. Thomas A. Garrett & David Paton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2020. "Taxing Gambling Machines To Enhance Public and Private Revenue," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(4), pages 500-523, November.
    16. Martin Young & Francis Markham, 2017. "Coercive commodities and the political economy of involuntary consumption: The case of the gambling industries," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 49(12), pages 2762-2779, December.

  12. Monica P. Escaleras & Peter T. Calcagno, 2009. "Does the Gubernatorial Term Limit Type Affect State Government Expenditures?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 37(5), pages 572-595, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.
    2. Dylan Brewer & Alyssa Carlson, 2021. "Addressing Sample Selection Bias for Machine Learning Methods," Working Papers 2102, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    3. Fredriksson, Per & Mamun, Khawaja, 2009. "Tobacco Politics and Electoral Accountability in the United States," Working Papers 2009003, Sacred Heart University, John F. Welch College of Business.
    4. Peter Calcagno & Joshua C. Hall, 2020. "Formal and informal constraints on state government and economic freedom," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(1), pages 801-806.
    5. Joseph J. Capuno & Stella A. Quimbo & Aleli D. Kraft & Carlos Antonio R. Tan, Jr., 2012. "The effects of term limits and yardstick competition on local government provision of health insurance and other public services : The Philippine case," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201201, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    6. Peter Calcagno & Alexander Marsella & Yang Zhou, 2024. "Income inequality and party alternation: State‐level evidence from the United States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(2), pages 355-374, April.

  13. Peter Calcagno & Christopher Westley, 2008. "An institutional analysis of voter turnout: the role of primary type and the expressive and instrumental voting hypotheses," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 94-110, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  14. Calcagno, Peter T. & Hefner, Frank L., 2007. "State Targeting of Business Investment: Does Targeting Increase Corporate Tax Revenue?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 37(2), pages 1-13.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Calcagno & Frank Hefner, 2018. "Targeted Economic Incentives: An Analysis of State Fiscal Policy and Regulatory Conditions," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 48(1), pages 71-91, Spring.
    2. Russell S. Sobel & Gary A. Wagner & Peter T. Calcagno, 2024. "The political economy of state economic development incentives: A case of rent extraction," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(1), pages 104-151, March.

  15. Peter Calcagno & Monica Escaleras, 2007. "Party alternation, divided government, and fiscal performance within US States," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 111-128, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  16. Christopher Westley & Peter T. Calcagno & Richard Ault, 2004. "Primary Election Systems and Candidate Deviation," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 365-376, Summer.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Calcagno & Christopher Westley, 2008. "An institutional analysis of voter turnout: the role of primary type and the expressive and instrumental voting hypotheses," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 94-110, June.

  17. Peter T. Calcagno & Henry Thompson, 2004. "State Economic Incentives: Stimulus or Reallocation?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 32(6), pages 651-665, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Calcagno & Frank Hefner, 2018. "Targeted Economic Incentives: An Analysis of State Fiscal Policy and Regulatory Conditions," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 48(1), pages 71-91, Spring.
    2. Timothy J. Bartik & George A. Erickcek, 2012. "Simulating the Effects of Michigan's MEGA Tax Credit Program on Job Creation and Fiscal Benefits," Upjohn Working Papers 12-185, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    3. Timothy J. Bartik & George Erickcek, 2014. "Simulating the Effects of the Tax Credit Program of the Michigan Economic Growth Authority on Job Creation and Fiscal Benefits," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 28(4), pages 314-327, November.
    4. Mikhail Ivonchyk, 2022. "Local Economic Development Policies and Business Activity: Dynamic Panel Data Analysis of All County Governments in the State of Georgia," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 36(2), pages 92-107, May.
    5. William Hoyt & Christopher Jepsen & Kenneth Troske, 2009. "Business Incentives and Employment: What Incentives Work and Where?," Working Papers 2009-02, University of Kentucky, Institute for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations.
    6. Russell S. Sobel & Gary A. Wagner & Peter T. Calcagno, 2024. "The political economy of state economic development incentives: A case of rent extraction," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(1), pages 104-151, March.
    7. Timothy J. Bartik, 2018. ""But For" Percentages for Economic Development Incentives: What percentage estimates are plausible based on the research literature?," Upjohn Working Papers 18-289, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    8. John Charles Bradbury, 2020. "Do Movie Production Incentives Generate Economic Development?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(2), pages 327-342, April.
    9. Calcagno, Peter T. & Hefner, Frank L., 2007. "State Targeting of Business Investment: Does Targeting Increase Corporate Tax Revenue?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 37(2), pages 1-13.
    10. Mark Partridge & Sydney Schreiner & Alexandra Tsvetkova & Carlianne Elizabeth Patrick, 2020. "The Effects of State and Local Economic Incentives on Business Start-Ups in the United States: County-Level Evidence," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 34(2), pages 171-187, May.
    11. Timothy J. Bartik & Kevin Hollenbeck, 2012. "An Analysis of the Employment Effects of the Washington High Technology Business and Occupation (B&O) Tax Credit," Upjohn Working Papers 12-187, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

  18. Calcagno, Peter T & Jackson, John D, 1998. "Political Action Committee Spending and Senate Roll Call Voting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 97(4), pages 569-585, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Randall Bennett & Christine Loucks, 2011. "Financial Services Industry PAC Contributions and Senate Committee Membership," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 203-216, September.
    2. John Patty, 2010. "Dilatory or anticipatory? Voting on the Journal in the House of Representatives," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 121-133, April.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2006-11-18 2008-02-23 2008-04-04
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2008-02-23 2008-04-04
  3. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2006-11-18 2008-04-04
  4. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic and Financial History (1) 2022-12-19

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