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PAC Spending and Roll Call Voting in the U.S. House: An Empirical Extension

Author

Listed:
  • Peter T. Calcagno

    () (Department of Economics and Finance, College of Charleston)

  • John D. Jackson

    (Department of Economics, Auburn University)

Abstract

This paper expands the investigation of how PAC spending affects the roll call voting behavior to the U.S. House of Representative. Using a theoretical framework which draws on the voting literature, we develop models that explain Representative’s voting behavior in a pre-PAC and post-PAC world. Testing both models we find weak support for a Downsian view of voting participation in the first model. The second model supports the alteration of voting incentives resulting from PAC spending. We find that PACs have a positive effect on voting participation. These results are consistent with earlier findings that investigate Senate behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter T. Calcagno & John D. Jackson, "undated". "PAC Spending and Roll Call Voting in the U.S. House: An Empirical Extension," Working Papers 4, Department of Economics and Finance, College of Charleston.
  • Handle: RePEc:coc:wpaper:4
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    File URL: http://www.cofc.edu/~econfinc/workingpapers/calcagno_Jackson.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:cup:apsrev:v:80:y:1986:i:01:p:89-106_18 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kau, James B & Rubin, Paul H, 1979. "Self-Interest, Ideology, and Logrolling in Congressional Voting," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 365-384, October.
    3. Stratmann, Thomas, 1998. "The Market for Congressional Votes: Is Timing of Contributions Everything?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 85-113, April.
    4. Kevin Grier & Michael Munger, 1986. "The impact of legislator attributes on interest-group campaign contributions," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 349-361, September.
    5. Grier, Kevin B & Munger, Michael C, 1991. "Committee Assignments, Constituent Preferences, and Campaign Contributions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(1), pages 24-43, January.
    6. Stratmann, Thomas, 2002. "Can Special Interests Buy Congressional Votes? Evidence from Financial Services Legislation," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 345-373, October.
    7. Anthony Downs, 1957. "An Economic Theory of Political Action in a Democracy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65, pages 135-135.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political Action Committees; Roll Call Voting; Congressional Voting;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government

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