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Supra National, National and Regional Dimensions of Voter Turnout in European Parliament Elections

Author

Listed:
  • Nadia Fiorino

    (University of L'Aquila)

  • Nicola Pontarollo

    (European Commission – JRC)

  • Roberto Ricciuti

    (University of Verona and CESifo)

Abstract

We argue that the decision to vote in European Parliamentary (EP) elections lies at the intersection of three political dimensions: one related to the attitude of citizens towards the European Union, one to the characteristics of the national political system, and the third associated with socio-economic variables observed by voters at the local level. This paper investigates this intersection by analyzing the last four EP elections in the EU-14, for 164 regions. We test a multilevel model. The results indicate a significant role of compulsory voting, domestic political cleavages, labor market conditions and trust in the EU. No evidence is found that GDP per capita affects turnout. Finally, the oldest segment of population seems more prone to vote than the youngest.

Suggested Citation

  • Nadia Fiorino & Nicola Pontarollo & Roberto Ricciuti, 2017. "Supra National, National and Regional Dimensions of Voter Turnout in European Parliament Elections," JRC Working Papers JRC108755, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  • Handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc108755
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nadia Fiorino & Nicola Pontarollo & Roberto Ricciuti, 2021. "Spatial links in the analysis of voter turnout in European Parliamentary elections," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 65-78, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    European Parliamentary elections; voter turnout; subnational variation; multilevel model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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