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Steven Michael Proud

Personal Details

First Name:Steven
Middle Name:Michael
Last Name:Proud
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppr126
Terminal Degree:2009 School of Economics, Finance and Management; University of Bristol (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(50%) Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO)
School of Economics, Finance and Management
University of Bristol

Bristol, United Kingdom
http://www.bris.ac.uk/cmpo/

: 0117 33 10799
0117 33 10705
2 Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TX
RePEc:edi:cmbriuk (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) School of Economics, Finance and Management
University of Bristol

Bristol, United Kingdom
http://www.efm.bris.ac.uk/

: 0117 928 8415
0117 928 8577
Priory Road Complex, Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TU
RePEc:edi:debriuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Steven Proud, 2017. "The Impact of Online Message-Boards on Performance in First Year Econometrics Units," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 17/685, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  2. Steven Proud, 2014. "Resits in Higher Education: Merely a Bar to Jump Over, or Do They Give a Pedagogical `Leg Up’?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 14/645, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  3. Robert Metcalfe & Simon Burgess & Steven Proud, 2011. "Student effort and educational attainment: Using the England football team to identify the education production function," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/276, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  4. Steven Proud, 2010. "Peer effects in English Primary schools: An IV estimation on the effect of a more able peer group on age 11 examination results," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/248, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  5. Steven Proud, 2009. "Girl Power? An analysis of peer effects using exogenous changes in the gender make-up of the peer group," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/186, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  6. Adele Atkinson & Simon Burgess & Paul Gregg & Carol Propper & Steven Proud, 2008. "The Impact of Classroom Peer Groups on Pupil GCSE Results," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/187, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

Articles

  1. Proud, S., 2014. "Girl Power? An Analysis Of Peer Effects Using Exogenous Changes In The Gender Make-Up Of The Peer Group," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(3), pages 5-18.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Robert Metcalfe & Simon Burgess and Steven Proud, 2011. "Student effort and educational attainment: Using the England football team to identify the education production function," Economics Series Working Papers 586, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The impact of poor scheduling of international football tournaments on English GCSE results
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-01-26 21:08:00

Working papers

  1. Robert Metcalfe & Simon Burgess & Steven Proud, 2011. "Student effort and educational attainment: Using the England football team to identify the education production function," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/276, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard Duhautois & Bastien Drut, 2017. "Is work duration in France affected by football tournaments?," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 14-19.
    2. Beland, Louis-Philippe & Murphy, Richard, 2015. "Ill communication: technology, distraction & studentperformance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62574, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Holford, Angus J., 2016. "Youth Employment and Academic Performance: Production Functions and Policy Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 10009, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Simon Burgess & Robert Metcalfe & Sally Sadoff, 2016. "Understanding the Response to Financial and Non-Financial Incentives in Education: Field Experimental Evidence Using High-Stakes Assessments," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 16/678, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    5. Kuehn, Zoe & Landeras, Pedro, 2012. "Study Time and Scholarly Achievement in PISA," MPRA Paper 49033, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Steven Proud, 2014. "Resits in Higher Education: Merely a Bar to Jump Over, or Do They Give a Pedagogical `Leg Up’?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 14/645, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    7. Adrian Chadi & Marco de Pinto & Gabriel Schultze, 2017. "Young, Gifted and Lazy? The Role of Ability and Labor Market Prospects in Student Effort Decisions," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201705, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

  2. Steven Proud, 2009. "Girl Power? An analysis of peer effects using exogenous changes in the gender make-up of the peer group," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/186, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicole Schneeweis & Martina Zweimüller, 2009. "Girls, girls, girls: gender composition and female school choice," Economics working papers 2009-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    2. Wen Fan, 2011. "School tenure and student achievement," Working Papers 201124, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Proud, S., 2014. "Girl Power? An Analysis Of Peer Effects Using Exogenous Changes In The Gender Make-Up Of The Peer Group," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(3), pages 5-18.

  3. Adele Atkinson & Simon Burgess & Paul Gregg & Carol Propper & Steven Proud, 2008. "The Impact of Classroom Peer Groups on Pupil GCSE Results," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/187, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Vincent Boucher & Yann Bramoullé & Habiba Djebbari & Bernard Fortin, 2014. "Do Peers Affect Student Achievement? Evidence From Canada Using Group Size Variation," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(1), pages 91-109, January.
    2. Stephen L. Ross, 2009. "Social Interactions within Cities: Neighborhood Environments and Peer Relationships," Working papers 2009-31, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    3. Duncan McVicar, 2012. "Cross Country Estimates of Peer Effects in Adolescent Smoking Using IV and School Fixed Effects," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n07, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. Duncan McVicar & Julie Moschion & Chris Ryan, 2016. "Achievement Effects from New Peers: Who Matters to Whom?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n17, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Mendolia, Silvia & Paloyo, Alfredo R. & Walker, Ian, 2016. "Heterogeneous effects of high school peers on educational outcomes," Ruhr Economic Papers 612, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Simon Burgess & Marcela Umaña-Aponte, 2011. "Raising your sights: the impact of friendship networks on educational aspirations," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/271, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    7. Lionel Perini, 2012. "Peer effects and school design: An analysis of efficiency and equity," IRENE Working Papers 12-01, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    8. Duncan McVicar & Julie Moschion & Chris Ryan, 2013. "Right Peer, Right Now? Endogenous Peer Effects and Achievement in Victorian Primary Schools," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n22, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

Articles

  1. Proud, S., 2014. "Girl Power? An Analysis Of Peer Effects Using Exogenous Changes In The Gender Make-Up Of The Peer Group," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(3), pages 5-18. See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (5) 2008-08-14 2008-08-14 2011-12-13 2012-01-10 2014-08-09. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (5) 2008-08-14 2008-08-14 2011-01-16 2011-12-13 2012-01-10. Author is listed
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (5) 2008-08-14 2008-08-14 2011-01-16 2011-12-13 2012-01-10. Author is listed
  4. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2008-08-14 2012-01-10
  5. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (2) 2008-08-14 2008-08-14
  6. NEP-SPO: Sports & Economics (2) 2011-12-13 2012-01-10
  7. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2012-01-10

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